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Suicide terrorism and post-mortem benefits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2014

Jacqueline M. Gray
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT, United Kingdom. j.gray@mdx.ac.ukhttp://www.mdx.ac.uk/aboutus/staffdirectory/Jacqueline_Gray.aspxt.dickins@mdx.ac.ukhttps://dissentwithmodification.com/
Thomas E. Dickins
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT, United Kingdom. j.gray@mdx.ac.ukhttp://www.mdx.ac.uk/aboutus/staffdirectory/Jacqueline_Gray.aspxt.dickins@mdx.ac.ukhttps://dissentwithmodification.com/

Abstract

Lankford claims that suicide terrorists are suicidal, but that their suicidal tendencies are often frustrated by injunctive social norms. Martyrdom represents a solution, and terrorist organizations exploit this. In this commentary, we claim that this argument has not been fully made and that such ideation in itself does not explain a willingness to engage in punitive actions against an enemy. We suggest the psychology of kinship as a possible missing factor.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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References

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