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So, are we the massively lucky species?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Derek C. Penn
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095. dcpenn@ucla.eduhttp://reasoninglab.psych.ucla.edu/holyoak@lifesci.ucla.eduhttp://reasoninglab.psych.ucla.edu/
Keith J. Holyoak
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095. dcpenn@ucla.eduhttp://reasoninglab.psych.ucla.edu/holyoak@lifesci.ucla.eduhttp://reasoninglab.psych.ucla.edu/
Daniel J. Povinelli
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA 70560. povinelli@louisiana.edu

Abstract

We are in vehement agreement with most of Vaesen's key claims. But Vaesen fails to consider or rebut the possibility that there are deep causal dependencies among the various cognitive traits he identifies as uniquely human. We argue that “higher-order relational reasoning” is one such linchpin trait in the evolution of human tool use, social intelligence, language, and culture.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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So, are we the massively lucky species?
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