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Mindful art

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2013

Lambros Malafouris*
Affiliation:
Advanced Studies Centre, Keble College, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PG, United Kingdom.lambros.malafouris@keble.ox.ac.ukhttp://www.keble.ox.ac.uk/academics/about/dr-lambros-malafouris

Abstract

Bullot & Reber (B&R) begin asking if the study of the mind's inner life can provide a foundation for a science of art. Clearly there are many epistemological problems involved in the study of the cognitive and affective basis of art appreciation. I argue that context is key. I also propose that as long as the “mind's life” continues to be perceived as an “inner” intracranial phenomenon, little progress can be made. Mind and art are one.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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References

Hutchins, E. (2010) Cognitive ecology. Topics in Cognitive Science 2:705–15.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ingold, T. (2010) The textility of making. Cambridge Journal of Economics 34:91102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malafouris, L. (2010) The brain–artefact interface (BAI): A challenge for archaeology and cultural neuroscience. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 5(2–3):264–73. DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsp057.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Malafouris, L. (2011) Enactive discovery: The aesthetic of material engagement. In: Situated aesthetics: Art beyond the skin, ed. Manzotti, R., pp. 123–41. Imprint Academic.Google Scholar
Malafouris, L. (2013) How things shape the mind: A theory of material engagement. MIT Press.Google Scholar

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