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Human tool-making capacities reflect increased information-processing capacities: Continuity resides in the eyes of the beholder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Kathleen R. Gibson
Affiliation:
Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Texas–Houston Medical School, Houston, TX, 77030. kathleen.r.gibson@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

Chimpanzee/human technological differences are vast, reflect multiple interacting behavioral processes, and may result from the increased information-processing and hierarchical mental constructional capacities of the human brain. Therefore, advanced social, technical, and communicative capacities probably evolved together in concert with increasing brain size. Interpretations of these evolutionary and species differences as continuities or discontinuities reflect differing scientific perspectives.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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References

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