Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-7j4dq Total loading time: 1.543 Render date: 2022-09-26T13:11:08.344Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Evidence of recursion in tool use

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2012

Lluís Barceló-Coblijn
Affiliation:
Human Evolution and Cognition Group, University of the Balearic Islands, 07122 Palma. toni.gomila@uib.catlluis.barcelo@uib.cathttp://evocog.org/
Antoni Gomila
Affiliation:
Human Evolution and Cognition Group, University of the Balearic Islands, 07122 Palma. toni.gomila@uib.catlluis.barcelo@uib.cathttp://evocog.org/

Abstract

We discuss the discovery of technologies involving knotted netting, such as textiles, basketry, and cordage, in the Upper Paleolithic. This evidence, in our view, suggests a new way of connecting toolmaking and syntactic structure in human evolution, because these technologies already exhibit an “infinite use of finite means,” which we take to constitute the key transition to human cognition.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Adovasio, J. M., Sofer, O. & Klima, B. (1996) Upper Paleolithic fibre technology: Interlaced woven finds from Pavlov I, Czech Republic, c. 26,000 years ago. Antiquity 70:526–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arbib, M. A. (2005) From monkey-like action recognition to human language: An evolutionary framework for neurolinguistics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28:105–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barceló-Coblijn, L. (in press) Evolutionary scenarios for the emergence of recursion. Theoria et Historia Scientiarum: International Journal for Interdisciplinary Studies.Google Scholar
Barceló-Coblijn, L. (2011) A biolinguistic approach to the vocalizations of H. neanderthalensis and the genus Homo. Biolinguistics 5(4):286334.Google Scholar
Calvin, W. (1993) The unitary hypothesis: A common neural circuitry for novel manipulations, language, plan-ahead, and throwing? In: Tools, language, and cognition in human evolution, ed. Gibson, K. & Ingold, T., pp. 230–50. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Camps, M. & Uriagereka, J. (2006) The Gordian knot of linguistic fossils. In: The biolinguistic turn. Issues on language and biology, ed. Rosselló, J. & Martín, J., pp. 3465. Publications of the University of Barcelona.Google Scholar
Chomsky, N. (1959) On certain formal properties of grammars. Information and Control 2:137–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fujita, K. (2009) A prospect of evolutionary adequacy: Merge and the evolution and development of human language. Biolinguistics 3 (2–3):128–53.Google Scholar
Greenfield, P. (1991) Language, tools and brain: The ontogeny and phylogeny of hierarchically organized sequential behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14:531–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hauser, M. D., Chomsky, N. & Fitch, W. T. (2002) The faculty of language: What is it, who has it, and how did it evolve? Science 298:1569–79.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Henshilwood, C. S. & Marean, C. W. (2003) The origin of modern human behavior. Current Anthropology 44:627–51.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rizzolatti, G. & Arbib, M. A. (1998) Language within our grasp. Trends in Neurosciences 21(5):188–94.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sofer, O., Adovasio, J. M., Illingworth, J. S., Amirkhanov, K. A., Praslov, N. D. & Street, M. (2000) Paleolithic perishables made permanent. Antiquity 74:812–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wadley, L. (2005) Putting ochre to the test: Replication studies of adhesives that may have been used for hafting tools in the Middle Stone Age. Journal of Human Evolution 49:587601.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Evidence of recursion in tool use
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Evidence of recursion in tool use
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Evidence of recursion in tool use
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *