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Estimation of technical interactions due to the competition for resource in a mixed-species fishery, and the typology of fleets and métiers in the English Channel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2001

Clara Ulrich
Affiliation:
Laboratoire halieutique, Ensar, 65, rue de St-Brieuc, CS 84215, 35042  Rennes cedex, France
Didier Gascuel
Affiliation:
Laboratoire halieutique, Ensar, 65, rue de St-Brieuc, CS 84215, 35042  Rennes cedex, France
Matthew R. Dunn
Affiliation:
CEFAS, Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR32 0HT, UK
Bertrand Le Gallic
Affiliation:
Cedem, UBO, 12, rue de Kergoat, BP 816, 29285 Brest cedex, France
Christian Dintheer
Affiliation:
Ifremer, rue de l’île d’Yeu, BP 21105, 44311 Nantes cedex 3, France
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Abstract

In a multi-gear and multi-species artisanal fishery, the level of technical interactions (i.e. the competitive externalities resulting from a shared exploitation of common resources or fishing grounds) among various fishing units is high. Assessing these technical interactions is of great importance for fishery management, as any control applied to one fishing unit may have positive or negative effects on others. The magnitude and direction of these effects cannot be easily measured, unless all fishing units and species in the fishery are considered simultaneously. Technical interactions are particularly important in the complex artisanal fisheries of the English Channel. Using a bioeconomic model of the English Channel that incorporates all the major fishing units (the BECHAMEL model), we describe a method for measuring and classifying the technical interactions due to the competition for resource (stock externalities). The results are used to develop a typology of métiers and fleets based on their overall level of interaction for the resource. We also define fleets and métiers as structuring, dependent, intermediate or autonomous.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Elsevier, IRD, Inra, Ifremer, Cemagref, CNRS, 2001

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