Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-4wdfl Total loading time: 0.343 Render date: 2022-07-06T01:47:42.400Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The case of total deafness II: Phrasing in the prelinguistic vocalizations of a child with congenital absence of cochleas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2008

Michael P. Lynch*
Affiliation:
Purdue University
*
Michael P. Lynch, Audiology and Speech Sciences, 1353 Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907

Abstract

Recent work has suggested that phrasing occurs in prelinguistic vocalizations, and that audition significantly influences prelinguistic vocal development. The present report is about the continuing study of a child who is referred to as congenitally acochlear because he was born with complete bilateral absence of cochleas. The only prior report on the vocal development of an acochlear child was provided in a previous article in this journal about the present subject (Lynch, Oiler, & Steffens, 1989). Because this child was not producing meaningful speech during the 27 to 42 months of age in which he was studied, investigation of him provided a unique opportunity to observe prelinguistic vocal development in the complete absence of auditory information. In the prior study of the acochlear child, the analytical focus was on developmental changes in relations between his syllable characteristics and those of mature speech. In the present study, the analytical focus was on a recently introduced approach to the study of prelinguistic vocalizations involving the description of syllable groupings within a prosodic hierarchy. Adult judges identified a hierarchy of syllables embedded within utterances and utterances embedded within prelinguistic phrases in the acochlear child's vocalizations. Similar to the prelinguistic phrases of typically developing infants and infants with Down syndrome previously reported on (Lynch, Oller, Steffens, & Buder, 1995), the present child's prelinguistic phrases were characterized by a systematic lengthening of phrase-final syllables and cohesive temporal patterning. In addition, the durations of the acochlear child's prelinguistic phrases were similar to those of typically developing infants. However, in contrast with those of typically developing infants and infants with Down syndrome, the durational features of the prelinguistic phrases of the acochlear child were relatively unstable across development. Overall, the results indicate that audition is not necessary for the formation of prelinguistic phrasing, but hearing does influence certain aspects of prelinguistic phrasing. Based on the data obtained on this subject, typically developing infants, and infants with Down syndrome, essential characteristics of well-formed prelinguistic phrases are proposed. These are termed “canonical” phrases; their production and development may be important in the acquisition of meaningful speech.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Beebe, B., & Gerstman, L. (1984). A method of defining “packages” of maternal stimulation and their functional significance for the infant with mother and stranger. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 7, 423440.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beck, P. J., & Turvey, M. T. (1992). Temporal patterning in cascade juggling. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 18, 934947.Google Scholar
Berger, J., & Cunningham, C. C. (1983). Development of early vocal behaviors and interactions in Down's syndrome and nonhandicapped infant-mother pairs. Developmental Psychology, 19, 322331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bloom, K., D’Odorico, L., & Beaumont, S (1993). Adult preferences for syllabic vocalizations: Generalizations to parity and native language. Infant Behavior and Development, 16, 109120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bronfenbrenner, U., & Ceci, S. (1994). Nature-nurture reconceptualized in developmental perspective. Psychological Review, 101, 568586.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chomsky, N., & Halle, M. (1968). The sound pattern of English. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
Cobo-Lewis, A. B., Oiler, D. K., Lynch, M. P., & Levine, S. L. (1996). Relations of motor and vocal milestones in typically developing infants and infants with Down syndrome. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 100, 456467.Google ScholarPubMed
Crown, C. L., Feldstein, S., Jasnow, M. D., & Beebe, B. (1992). Down's syndrome and infant gaze: Gaze behavior of Down's syndrome and nondelayed infants in interactions with their mothers. Acta Paedopsychiatrica-International Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 55, 5155.Google ScholarPubMed
Cruttenden, A. (1986). Intonation. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Crystal, D. (1969). Prosodic systems and intonation in English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. J. (1975). On the dynamic use of prosody in speech perception. In Cohen, A. & Nooteboom, S. G. (Eds.), Structure and process in speech perception (pp. 178194). New York: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Feldastein, S., Jaffe, J., Beebe, B., & Crown, C. L. (1993). Coordinated interpersonal timing in adult-infant vocal interactions: A cross-site replication. Infant Behavior and Developinent, 16, 455470.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernald, A. (1985). Four month old infants prefer to listen to Motherese. Infant Behavior and Development, 8, 181195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernald, A. (1993). Approval and disapproval: Infant responsiveness to vocal affect in familiar and unfamiliar languages. Child Development, 64, 657674.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fernald, A., & Morikawa, H. (1993). Common themes and cultural variations in Japanese and American mothers' speech to infants. Child Development, 64, 637656.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fogel, A., & Hannan, T. E. (1985). Manual actions of nine- to fifteen-week-old human infants during face-to-face interaction with their mothers. Child Development, 56, 12711279.Google ScholarPubMed
Fonagy, I., & Magdics, K. (1960). Speed of utterance in phrases of different lengths. Language and Speech, 3, 179192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gentner, D. R, (1987). Timing of skilled motor performance: Tests of the proportional duration model. Psychological Review, 94, 255276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jaffe, J., & Stern, D. N. (1973). “Conversational” coupling of gaze behavior in prelinguistic human development. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 2, 321329.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kent, R. D., Osberger, M. J., Netsell, R., & Hustedde, C. G. (1987). Phonetic development in identical twins differing in auditory function. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 52, 6475.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kohler, K. J. (1983). Prosodic boundary signals in German. Phonetica, 40, 89134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levitt, A. G., & Wang, Q. (1991). Evidence for language-specific rhythmic influences in the reduplicative babbling of French- and English-learning infants. Language and Speech, 34, 235249.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewedag, V. L., Oller, D. K., & Lynch, M. P. (1994). Infants' vocalization patterns across home and laboratory environments. First Language, 14, 4965.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lindblom, B., & Rapp, K. (1973). Some temporal regularities of spoken Swedish. PILUS (Papers from the Institute of Linguistics, University of Stockholm), 21.Google Scholar
Lindblom, B. E. F. (1978). Final lengthening in speech and music (pp. 85101). In Garding, E. et al. (Eds.), Nordic prosody. Lund University, Department of Linguistics.Google Scholar
Lyberg, B. (1977). Some observations on the timing of Swedish utterances. Journal of Phonetics, 5, 4959.Google Scholar
Lynch, M. P., & Eilers, R. E. (1991). Perspectives on early language from typical development and Down syndrome. In Bray, N. W. (Ed.), International review of research on mental retardation (pp. 5590). New York: Academic.Google Scholar
Lynch, M. P., Oller, D. K., & Steffens, M. (1989). Development of speech-like vocalizations in a child with congenital absence of cochleas: The case of total deafness. Applied Psycholinguistics, 10, 315333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lynch, M. P., Oller, D. K., Steffens, M. L., & Buder, E. (1995). Phrasing in prelinguistic vocalizations. Developmental Psychobiology, 28, 325.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
MacNeilage, P. F., & Davis, B. (1990). Acquisition of speech production: Frames, then content. In Jeannerod, M. (Ed.), Attention and performance: Vol. 13. Motor representation and control (pp. 453476). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Malecot, A., Johnston, R., & Kizziar, P. A. (1972). Syllabic rate and utterance length in French. Phonetica, 26, 235251.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Marler, P., & Sherman, V. (1983). Song structure without auditory feedback: Emendations of the auditory template hypothesis. Journal of Neuroscience, 3, 517531.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Martin, J. G. (1975). Rhythmic expectancy in continuous speech perception. In Cohen, A. & Nooteboom, S. G. (Eds.), Structure and process in speech perception (pp. 161177). New York: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Masataka, N. (1992). Motherese in a signed language. Infant Behavior and Development, 15, 453460.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murray, L., & Trevarthen, C. (1986). The infant's role in mother-infant communications. Journal of Child Language, 13, 1529.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nooteboom, S. G., & Cohen, A. (1975). Anticipation in speech production and its implications for perception. In Cohen, A. & Nooteboom, S. G. (Eds.), Structure and process in speech perception (pp. 124145). New York: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oiler, D. K. (1973). The effect of position in utterance on speech segment duration in English. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 54, 12351247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oiler, D. K. (1986). Metaphonology and infant vocalizations. In Lindblom, B. & Zetterstrom, R. (Eds.), Precursors of early speech (pp. 2135). New York: Stockton Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oiler, D. K., & Eilers, R. E. (1988). The role of audition in infant babbling. Child Development, 59, 441449.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oiler, D. K., Eilers, R. E., Bull, D. H., & Carney, A. E. (1985). Prespeech vocalizations of a deaf infant: A comparison with normal metaphonological development. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 28, 4763.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oller, D. K., & Lynch, M. P. (1992). Infant vocalizations and innovations in infraphonology: Toward a broader theory of development and disorders. In Ferguson, C., Menn, L., & Stoel-Gammon, C. (Eds.), Phonological development (pp. 509536). Parkton, MD: York Press.Google Scholar
Oller, D. K., & Smith, B. L. (1977). Effect of final-syllable position on vowel duration in infant babbling. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 62, 994997.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Papousek, H., & Papousek, M. (1979). The infant's fundamental adaptive response system in social interaction. In Thoman, E. (Ed.), Origins of the infant's social responsiveness (pp. 179208). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Papousek, H., & Papousek, M. (1982). Infant-adult social interactions: Their origins, dimensions, and failures. In Field, T. M., Huston, A., Quay, H. C., Troll, L., & Finley, G. E. (Eds.), Review of human development (pp. 148163). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Papousek, H., & Papousek, M. (1987). Intuitive parenting: A dialectic counterpart to the infant's precocity in integrative capacities. In Osofsky, J. D. (Ed.), Handbook of infant development (pp. 669720). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Papousek, H., & Papousek, M. (1989). Intuitive parenting: Aspects related to educational psychology. European Journal of Psychology of Education. 4, 201210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Papousek, M. (1994). Vom ersten schrei zum ersten wort. Anfonge der spracheniwicklung in der vorsprachlicken kommunikation. Bern: Verlag Hans Huber.Google Scholar
Papousek, M., Bornstein, M. H., Nuzzo, C., & Papousek, H. (1990). Infant responses to prototypical melodic contours in parental speech. Infant Behavior and Development, 13, 539545.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Papousek, M., Papousek, H., & Bornstein, M. H. (1984). The naturalistic vocal environment of young infants: On the significance of homogeneity and variability in parental speech. In Field, T. M. & Fox, N. (Eds.), Social perception in infants (pp. 269297). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
Papousek, M., Papousek, H., & Symmes, D. (1991). The meanings of melodies in motherese in tone and stress languages. Infant Behavior and Development, 14, 415440.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pike, K. L. (1945). The intonation of American English. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Poppel, E. (1985). Mindworks: Time and conscious experience. Boston: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.Google Scholar
Schleidt, M., Eibl-Eibesfeldt, I., & Poppel, E. (1987). A universal constant in temporal segmentation of human short-term behavior. Naturwissenschaften, 74, 289290.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shaffer, L. H. (1982). Rhythm and timing in skill. Psychological Review, 89, 109122.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Steffens, M. L., Oiler, D. K., Lynch, M. P., & Urbano, R. C. (1992). Vocal development in infants with Down syndrome and infants who are developing normally. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 97, 235246.Google ScholarPubMed
Stern, D. (1985). The interpersonal world of the infant. New York: Basic.Google Scholar
Stern, D., Beebe, B., Jaffe, J., & Bennett, S. (1977). The infant's stimulus world during social interaction: A study of caregiver behaviors with particular reference to repetition and timing. In Schaffer, H. (Ed.), Studies in mother-infant interaction. New York: Academic.Google Scholar
Stern, D. N., Spieker, S., & MacKain, K. (1982). Intonation contours as signals in maternal speech to prelinguistic infants. Developmental Psychology, 18, 727735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stoel-Gammon, C., & Otomo, K. (1986). Babbling development of hearing-impaired and normally hearing subjects. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 51, 3341.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Strangert, E. (1978). Temporal aspects of rhythm in Swedish. In Garding, E., Bruce, G., & Bannert, R. (Eds.), Nordic prosody (pp. 103108). Lund University, Department of Linguistics.Google Scholar
Tannock, R. (1988). Mother directiveness in their interactions with their children with and without Down syndrome. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 93, 154165.Google ScholarPubMed
Thelen, E. (1991). Motor aspects of emergent speech: A dynamic approach. In Krasnegor, N. (Ed.), Biobehavioral foundations of language (pp. 339362). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Tomasello, M., & Farrar, M. J. (1986). Joint attention and early language. Child Development, 57, 14541463.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trehub, S. E., Unyk, A. M., & Trainor, L. J. (1993a). Adults identify infant-directed music across cultures. Infant Behavior and Development, 16, 193211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trehub, S. E., Unyk, A. M., & Trainor, L. J. (1993b). Maternal singing in cross-cultural perspective. Infant Behavior and Development. 16, 285295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turner, F. (1985). Natural classicism: Essays on literature and science. New York: Paragon House.Google Scholar
West, M. J., & King, A. P. (1988). Female visual displays affect the development of male song in the cowbird. Nature, 334, 244246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, M. J., King, A. P., & Duff, M. A. (1990). Communicating about communicating: When innate is not enough. Developmental Psychobiology, 23(7), 585598.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wingfield, A. (1975). The intonation-syntax interaction: Prosodic features in perceptual processing of sentences. In Cohen, A. & Nooteboom, S. G. (Eds.), Structure and process in speech perception (pp. 146160). New York: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zlatin-Laufer, M. (1980). Temporal regularity in prespeech. In Murray, T. & Murray, A. (Eds.), Infant communication: Cry and early speech. Houston: College-Hill.Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The case of total deafness II: Phrasing in the prelinguistic vocalizations of a child with congenital absence of cochleas
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The case of total deafness II: Phrasing in the prelinguistic vocalizations of a child with congenital absence of cochleas
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The case of total deafness II: Phrasing in the prelinguistic vocalizations of a child with congenital absence of cochleas
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *