Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-2qt69 Total loading time: 0.197 Render date: 2022-08-18T14:19:48.159Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

On pursuit curves

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2009

J. C. Barton
Affiliation:
North Carlton, VIC 3054, Australia.
C. J. Eliezer
Affiliation:
School of Mathematics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3084, Australia.
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Extract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Recently, several papers [2–4, 6] have been published concerning a pursuit problem which was apparently first posed explicitly by Leonardo da Vinci and which may have been present in earlier thinking about kinematics and geometry. Falconry appears to go back, in Europe, to the days of Pliny, Aristotle and Martial, and, in Asia, to 2000 BC [5].

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Australian Mathematical Society 2000

References

[1]Boole, G. A., Treatise on differential equations (Cambridge, Macmillan and Co., 1859) p. 246.Google Scholar
[2]Colman, W. J. A., “A curve of pursuit”, Bulletin of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications 27 (3) (1991) pp. 4547.Google Scholar
[3]Eliezer, C.J. and Barton, J.C., “Pursuit curves”, Bulletin of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications 28 (11, 12) (1992) pp. 182184.Google Scholar
[4]Eliezer, C.J. and Barton, J.C., “Pursuit curves II”, Bulletin of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications 31 (9, 10) (1995) pp. 139141.Google Scholar
[5]Encyclopaedia Britannica, Ninth Edition, vol. IX, MDCCCLXXIX, p. 6.Google Scholar
[6]Guha, A. and Biswas, S.K., “On Leonardo da Vinci's cat and mouse problem”, Bulletin of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications 30 (1, 2) (1994) pp. 1215.Google Scholar
You have Access
14
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

On pursuit curves
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

On pursuit curves
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

On pursuit curves
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *