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The seal matrix of Sir John Campbell and the struggle for Dunyvaig Castle on the Isle of Islay

  • Steven Mithen (a1), Darko Maričević (a1) and Roddy Regan (a2)

Abstract

The great feud between the clans Campbell and MacDonald in the early seventeenth century AD was part of a power struggle for control of Islay, the seat of the Lord of the Isles, and encompassed wider political, economic and religious change in the region and beyond from the sixteenth century. The discovery of a seal matrix found during excavations at Dunyvaig Castle reveals the personal story of Sir John Campbell of Cawdor (1576–1642) in these broader political events.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence (Email: s.j.mithen@reading.ac.uk)

References

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Caldwell, D.H. 1993. Lead seal matrices of the 16th and early 17th century. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 123: 373–80.
Caldwell, D.H. 2008. Islay: the land of the lordship. Edinburgh: Birlnn.
Cowan, E.J. 1979. Clanship, kinship and the Campbell acquisition of Islay. Scottish Historical Review 58: 132–57.
Jackson, C.J. 1905. English goldsmiths and their marks: a history of the goldsmiths and plateworkers of England, Scotland and Ireland. London: Macmillan & Co.
Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. 1984. Inventory of Argyll, volume 5: Islay, Jura, Colonsay and Oronsay. Edinburgh: RCAHMS.

Keywords

The seal matrix of Sir John Campbell and the struggle for Dunyvaig Castle on the Isle of Islay

  • Steven Mithen (a1), Darko Maričević (a1) and Roddy Regan (a2)

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