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Article contents

Tombs with a view: landscape, monuments and trees

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Vicki Cummings
Affiliation:
School of History and Archaeology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3XU (1 Email: cummingsVM@cardiff.ac.uk; 2 Email: whittle@cardiff.ac.uk)
Alasdair Whittle
Affiliation:
School of History and Archaeology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3XU (1 Email: cummingsVM@cardiff.ac.uk; 2 Email: whittle@cardiff.ac.uk)

Abstract

The authors consider the impact that trees would have had on the visibility of the landscape from and around Neolithic monuments. It is suggested that woodland may have been an integral part of the way monuments were experienced.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd. 2003

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