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Ice Accretion Under Natural and Laboratory Conditions

  • K. Itagaki (a1), G. E. Lemieux (a1) and H. W. Bosworth (a1)

Abstract

To compare results of icing studies conducted in wind tunnels with natural icing conditions, a series of rotor icing studies were made on top of Mt. Washington, New Hampshire. The results indicated that considerable differences exist between the two under conditions of similar liquid water content and temperature. The wet-to-dry growth transition temperature, for instance, with comparable temperature and liquid water content, may be more than 10°C higher under natural conditions than in wind tunnel studies. The possible cause of such discrepancies was found to be the vapor saturation existing in most laboratory experiments. The transition temperature of ice accretion measured in natural fog on board an aircraft agreed better with the results of the Mt. Washington study.

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References

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