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Effects of different husbandry systems on milk production of purebred and crossbred sheep

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

A. P. Mavrogenis
Affiliation:
Agricultural Research Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus
A. Louca
Affiliation:
Agricultural Research Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus
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Abstract

The effects of different husbandry systems on production characters of 616 purebred and crossbred sheep are reported. The Cyprus Fat-tailed (L), Chios (C) and Awassi (A) breeds were evaluated under intensive, semi-intensive and extensive production systems. The performance of crossbred (C × L, A × L and A × C) Cyprus Fat-tailed and Awassi sheep was compared under extensive husbandry conditions. Ewes on the intensive systems produced more milk, fat and protein (P<0·01), but with somewhat lower fat and protein content than those on the extensive or semi-intensive systems. Chios and Awassi ewes were superior to Cyprus Fat-tailed ewes in nearly all traits (P<0·1), but inferior in terms of fat and protein content (P<0·1). Awassi × Chios crossbreds outyielded both purebred and crossbred sheep in terms of milk, fat and protein yield (P<0·1). Lactation number had a significant effect on milk traits. Maximum milk production was obtained at fourth lactation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1980

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References

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