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Developing breeding objectives for beef cattle production 1. A bio-economic simulation model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

H. Hirooka
Affiliation:
Faculty of Economics, Ryukoku University, 612–8577 Kyoto, Japan
A. F. Groen
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Breeding, Wageningen Institute of Animal Sciences, PO Box 338, 6700 AH Wageningen, The Netherlands
J. Hillers
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman 99164, USA
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Abstract

A deterministic simulation model was constructed to develop breeding objectives and estimate biological and economic values. The model simulates life-cycle production of a breeding cow and growth performance of her offspring. Input variables are divided into four categories: animal traits, nutritional variables, management variables and economic variables. The economic variables assume typical beef cattle production in Japan. The outputs from the model include cow-calf performance, feedlot performance and biological and economic efficiency. The model's ability to simulate herd composition, food intake of cow and calves, cow body-weight changes, empty body and carcass composition of feedlot animals and production efficiencies is illustrated.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1998

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