Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-9pqtr Total loading time: 0.305 Render date: 2021-04-14T21:10:05.134Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Breed variations in the shape of the lactation curve of cattle and their implications for efficiency

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

P. D. P. Wood
Affiliation:
Milk Marketing Board, Thames Ditton, Surrey KT7 0EL
Get access

Abstract

Mean daily milk yield, fat percentage and protein percentage were recorded monthly, from August 1978 to July 1979. for 579 303 British Friesian, 6 608 Shorthorn, 27 374 Ayrshire, 19 529 Jersey, and 19 760 Guernsey cattle and classified by breed, parity and stage of lactation. Parameters of the function y(n) = anb ecn were estimated for each breed/parity group for yield, fat percentage and yield, protein percentage and yield, and energy (MJ) output as milk (b and c describe the shape of the curve, a is a scalar, n the week of lactation and e the base of natural logarithms). In the mature cows of each breed (parity 4 or more), the shape constants (b, c) for milk, fat and protein production in kg respectively were:

Generally, cows of all five breeds which calved in the winter produced about 4% more milk, fat and protein than average, and those that calved in the summer produced about 4% less. After allowing for that, and removing the effect of the calving pattern, a seasonal variation in production occurred to produce a peak in June 1979 nearly 12% above average for liquid milk, in July 1979 about 4% for fat and in June 1979 about 12% for protein production (not percentage). Trough month was January 1979 for all three characters: —8%; —4% and — 9% respectively.

A consideration of the theory of metabolizable energy suggested that the peak of energy output which occurred about week 4 of lactation in all breeds and parities, expressed as a fraction of the live weight of the animal, had a critical bearing on the need to mobilize body reserves.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1980

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Cobby, J. M. and Le Du, Y. L. P. 1978. On fitting curves to lactation data. Anim. Prod. 26: 127133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Milk Marketing Board, 1972. The use of herd management control. Rep. Breed. Prod. Org. Milk Mktg Bd, No. 22, pp. 3537.Google Scholar
Milk Marketing Board. 1978. Seasonal calving pattern. Rep. Breed. Prod. Org. Milk Mktg Bd, No. 28, pp. 8485.Google Scholar
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries for Scotland and Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland. 1975. Energy allowances and feeding systems for ruminants. Tech. Bull. 33. Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London.Google Scholar
Sanders, H. G. 1930. The analysis of the lactation curve into maximum yield and persistency. J. agric. Sci., Camb. 20: 145185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P. 1967. Algebraic model of the lactation curve n i cattle. Nature, Lond. 216: 164165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P. 1968. Factors affecting persistency of lactation in cattle. Nature, Lond. 218: 894.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P. 1969. Factors affecting the shape of the lactation curve in cattle. Anim. Prod. 11: 307316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P. 1970. The relationship between the month of calving and milk production. Anim. Prod. 12: 253259.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P. 1972. A note on seasonal fluctuations in milk production. Anim. Prod. 15: 8992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P. 1976. Algebraic models of the lactation curves for milk, fat and protein production, with estimates of seasonal variation. Anim. Prod. 22: 3540.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P., King, J. O. L. and Youdan, P. G. 1980. Relationships between size, live-weight change and milk production characters in early lactation in dairy cattle. Anim. Prod. 31: 143151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, P. D. P. and Newcomb, R. 1976. The effect of supplementary winter feeding on the total yield and lactation curves of cows in a herd of British Friesian cattle. J. agric. Sci, Camb. 87: 101104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Woodman, H. E. 1957. Rations for livestock. Minist. Agric. Fish. Fd Bull. No. 48. 5th ed.Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 22 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 14th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Breed variations in the shape of the lactation curve of cattle and their implications for efficiency
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Breed variations in the shape of the lactation curve of cattle and their implications for efficiency
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Breed variations in the shape of the lactation curve of cattle and their implications for efficiency
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *