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Introduction to the Symposium on Transnational Futures of International Labor Law

  • Adelle Blackett (a1) and Laurence R. Helfer (a2)
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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

References

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1 News and Events: The ILO Centenary, Int'l Labour Org.

2 See, e.g., Antony Alcock,History of the International Labor Organization(1971); Ernst B. Haas,Beyond the Nation-State: Functionalism and International Organization (1964); The Origins of the International Labor Organization (James T. Shotwell ed., 1934).

3 See Karen Curtis, Democracy, Freedom of Association, and the ILO, in Les Normes Internationales du Travail: Un Patrimoine pour L'avenir 89 (Jean-Claude Javillier & Bernard Gernigon eds., 2006).

4 See International Labour Conference, Declaration Concerning the Policy of “Apartheid” of the Republic of South Africa, Int'l Labour Org. (1964).

5 Int'l Labour Conference, ILO Centenary Declaration for the Future of Work, Int'l Labour Org. (June 21, 2019).

6 Int'l Labour Org., Violence and Harassment Convention, C190, June 10, 2019; Int'l Labour Org., Violence and Harassment Recommendation, R206, June 10, 2019.

7 ILO100: Law for Social Justice, International Conference on the Occasion of the Centenary Celebration of the International Labour Organization, Int'l Labour Org. (April 15–17, 2019).

8 A full archive of the course lectures is available online: https://www.mcgill.ca/lldrl/what-we-teach/tfill. A special Fall 2020 issue of the International Labour Review will include another selection of papers from the course.

9 Adelle Blackett & Anne Trebilcock, Conceptualizing Transnational Labour Law, in Research Handbook on Transnational Labour Law 5 (Adelle Blackett & Anne Trebilcock eds., 2015).

10 Philip Jessup, Transnational Law (1956); Wilfred Jenks,Common Law of Mankind (1958) (discussed in Blackett & Trebilcock, supra note 9, at 22).

11 Constitution of the International Labour Organization, June 28, 1919, 49 Stat. 2712, 225 C.T.I.A. 373.

12 Transnational Legal Ordering (Gregory Shaffer & Terence C. Halliday, eds., 2015).

13 Peer Zumbansen, Transnational Law, Evolving, in Elgar Encyclopedia of Comparative Law (Jan M. Smits ed., 2012).

14 Adelle Blackett,Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers’ Transnational Challenge To International Labor Law (2019).

15 Blackett & Trebilcock, supra note 9, at 4.

16 Adelle Blackett, Theorizing Emancipatory Transnational Futures of International Labor Law, 113 AJIL Unbound 390 (2019).

17 Laurence R. Helfer, The ILO at 100: Institutional Innovation in an Era of Populism, 113 AJIL Unbound 396 (2019).

18 Liam McHugh-Russell, International Labor Law and Its Others: Governance by Norm Versus Governance by Knowledge, 113 AJIL Unbound 402 (2019).

19 Álvaro Santos, Reimagining Trade Agreements for Workers: Lessons from the USMCA, 113 AJIL Unbound 407 (2019).

20 Guy Fiti Sinclair, Past as Prologue? Theorizing Transnational Labor Law Between Jessup and Jenks, 113 AJIL Unbound 413 (2019).

21 Id. at 413.

22 Mimi Zou, China and the Belt and Road Initiative: Transnational Labor Law Under State Capitalism 4.0, 113 AJIL Unbound 418 (2019).

23 In the United States, the late Virginia Leary was a trailblazer in the field of international labor law. The American Society of International Law recognized her with the Goler T. Butcher Medal in 2008.

24 Declaration Concerning the Aims and Purposes of the International Labour Organization (adopted May 10, 1944 in Philadelphia). The Declaration's more noteworthy statements include the following: “Labour is not a commodity;” “Freedom of expression and of association are essential to sustained progress;” “Poverty anywhere constitutes a danger to prosperity everywhere;” and “All human beings, irrespective of race, creed or sex, have the right to pursue both their material well-being and their spiritual development in conditions of freedom and dignity, of economic security and equal opportunity.”

25 Karl Klare, Horizons of Transformative Labour Law, in Labour Law in the Era of Globalization: Transformative Practices and Possibilities 1, 3 (Joanne Conaghan et al. eds., 2002). See also Quinn Slobodian,Globalists: The End of Empire and the Birth of Neoliberalism (2018) (recalling that neoliberalism included an alternative transnational embedding).

Introduction to the Symposium on Transnational Futures of International Labor Law

  • Adelle Blackett (a1) and Laurence R. Helfer (a2)

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