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Special Issue: Understanding, representing, and reasoning about style

  • CLAUDIA M. ECKERT (a1) and ELLEN YI-LUEN DO (a2)

Extract

Style is a word that people think they understand. Most people recognize artifacts like buildings and clothes as being exemplars of particular styles, and they know words like Rococo and Art Deco as names for styles. They can recognize stylistic similarities not only in one sort of artifact but also across wide ranges of different things, such as buildings, furniture, artworks, clothes, music, and even manners. However, “style” is a slippery notion: the word has been used in a variety of senses since the ancient Greeks first thought about the differences in how people wrote or painted, and it is still used to refer to different things.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Reprint requests to: Ellen Yi-Luen Do, College of Architecture, Georgia Institute of Technology, 247 4th Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0155, USA. E-mail: ellendo@cc.gatech.edu

References

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REFERENCES

Koile, K. (2004). An intelligent assistant for conceptual design: informed search using a mapping of abstract qualities to physical form. In Design Computing and Cognition '04 (Gero, J.S., Ed.), pp. 322. Cambridge, MA: Kluwer Academic.
Koning, H. & Eizenberg, J. (1981). The language of the prairie: Frank Lloyd Wright's prairie houses. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 8(3), 295323.
McCormack, J.P., Cagan, J., & Vogel, C.M. (2004). Speaking the Buick language: capturing, understanding and exploring brand identity with shape grammars. Design Studies, 25(1), 129.
Pugliese, M. & Cagan, J. (2002). Capturing a rebel: modeling the Harley-Davidson brand through a motorcycle shape grammar. Research in Engineering Design, 13(2), 139156.

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