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Theoretical Aspects of Thrust Vector Control by Secondary Gas Injection in Rocket Nozzles

  • John H. Neilson (a1), Alastair Gilchrist (a1) and Chee K. Lee (a1)

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This work deals with theoretical aspects of thrust vector control in rocket nozzles by the injection of secondary gas into the supersonic region of the nozzle. The work is concerned mainly with two-dimensional flow, though some aspects of three-dimensional flow in axisymmetric nozzles are considered. The subject matter is divided into three parts. In Part I, the side force produced when a physical wedge is placed into the exit of a two-dimensional nozzle is considered. In Parts 2 and 3, the physical wedge is replaced by a wedge-shaped “dead water” region produced by the separation of the boundary layer upstream of a secondary injection port. The modifications which then have to be made to the theoretical relationships, given in Part 1, are enumerated. Theoretical relationships for side force, thrust augmentation and magnification parameter for two- and three-dimensional flow are given for secondary injection normal to the main nozzle axis. In addition, the advantages to be gained by secondary injection in an upstream direction are clearly illustrated. The theoretical results are compared with experimental work and a comparison is made with the theories of other workers.

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1. Mager, A. On the Model of the Free, Shock-Separated Turbulent Boundary Layer. J. Aero Sci, Vol 23, pp 181184, February 1956.
2. Bogdonoff, S. M. Some Experimental Studies of the Separation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers. Reprint of Papers, Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Institute, University of California, June 1955.
3. Romeo, D. J. and Sterrett, J. R. Aerodynamic Inter-action Effects Ahead of a Sonic Jet Exhausting Perpendicularly from a Flat Plate into a Mach Number 6 Free Stream. NASA TN D-743, April 1961.
4. Vinson, P. W., Amick, J. L. and Liepman, H. P. Interaction Effects Produced by Jet Exhausting Laterally near Base of Ogive-Cylinder Model in Supersonic Main Stream. NASA Memo 12-5-58W, February 1959.
5. Wu, J. M., Chapkis, R. L. and Mager, A. An Approximate Analysis of Thrust Vector Control by Fluid Injection. ARS J 31, 1677-1685, December 1961.
6. Morgan, E. J. An Analysis of Gaseous Secondary Injection into Rocket Nozzles. ARS 2335-62, ARS Solid Propellent Rocket Conference, Waco, Texas, January 1962.
7. Neilson, J. H Gilchrist, A. and Lee, C. K. A Theory for the Side Force Produced in Two-Dimensional Nozzles by Secondary Gas Injection. (Paper 3 of this Series to be published in the AJRAeS, March 1968).
8. Neilson, J. H., Gilchrist, A. and Lee, C. K. Thrust Vector Control by Secondary Gas Injection into Rocket Nozzles. (To be published.)
9. Neilson, J. H., Gilchrist, A. and Lee, C. K. Thrust Vector Control by Secondary Gas Injection in Two-Dimensional Nozzles. AJRAeS, Vol 72, pp 7781, January 1968.
10. Neilson, J. H., Gilchrist, A. and Lee, C. K. Control Forces in Rocket Nozzles Produced by a Secondary Gas Stream Inclined at Various Angles to the Nozzle Axis. (To be published.)

Theoretical Aspects of Thrust Vector Control by Secondary Gas Injection in Rocket Nozzles

  • John H. Neilson (a1), Alastair Gilchrist (a1) and Chee K. Lee (a1)

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