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Recent Developments in High Speed Research

In the Aerodynamics Division of the National Physical Laboratory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2016

Extract

Much work has been done on compressible flow since the contribution of the Aerodynamics Division to research in this field was last described to the Society by the late C. N. H. Lock in 1937. At that time he was able to review many of the data which were available from other sources, whereas today such a task would be impossible in a paper of this length. We shall confine ourselves here, therefore, to a description of some of the experimental work that has been done during the past few years in the high-speed laboratory of the Division, and to an account of the lines along which it is intended to continue the work in the future.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Aeronautical Society 1950

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