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Psychopharmacology and people with learning disability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

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Extract

“These medications (antipsychotic drugs) were originally developed to treat not the mentally handicapped but the mentally ill; those, for example, with schizophrenia, paranoia and other specific conditions, but now the far wider use of these drugs has been challenged because there is evidence that they can produce serious side-effects in addition to the distress already suffered. Future changes in the use of antipsychotic drugs in the UK may come from the Royal College of Psychiatrists or from action in the Law Courts” (Public Eye, BBC2, 1.5.92).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 1999 

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