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Willingness to pay for beef is highly transferrable between different consumer groups

  • S. P. F. Bonny (a1) (a2), J.-F. Hocquette (a2) (a3), D. W. Pethick (a1), I. Legrand (a4), J. Wierzbicki (a5), P. Allen (a6), L. J. Farmer (a7), R. J. Polkinghorne (a8) and G. E. Gardner (a1)...

Abstract

Accurately quantifying a consumer’s willingness to pay (WTP) for beef of different eating qualities is intrinsically linked to the development of eating-quality-based meat grading systems, and therefore the delivery of consistent, quality beef to the consumer. Following Australian MSA (Meat Standards Australia) testing protocols, over 19 000 consumers from Northern Ireland, Poland, Ireland, France and Australia were asked to detail their willingness to pay for beef from one of four categories that best described the sample; unsatisfactory, good-every-day, better-than-every-day or premium quality. These figures were subsequently converted to a proportion relative to the good-every-day category (P-WTP) to allow comparison between different currencies and time periods. Consumers also answered a short demographic questionnaire. Consumer P-WTP was found to be remarkably consistent between different demographic groups. After quality grade, by far the greatest influence on P-WTP was country of origin. This difference was unable to be explained by the other demographic factors examined in this study, such as occupation, gender, frequency of consumption and the importance of beef in the diet. Therefore, we can conclude that the P-WTP for beef is highly transferrable between different consumer groups, but not countries.

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Corresponding author

E-mail: spfbonny@gmail.com

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a

Present address: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.

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References

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Bonny, SPF, Hocquette, J-F, Pethick, DW, Farmer, LJ, Legrand, I, Wierzbicki, J, Allen, P, Polkinghorne, RJ and Gardner, GE 2017a. Untrained consumer assessment of the eating quality of beef: 1. A single composite score can predict beef quality grades. Animal 11, 13891398.
Bonny, SPF, Hocquette, J-F, Pethick, DW, Farmer, LJ, Legrand, I, Wierzbicki, J, Allen, P, Polkinghorne, RJ and Gardner, GE 2017b. Untrained consumer assessment of the eating quality of beef: 2. Demographic factors have only minor effects on consumer scores and willingness to pay. Animal 11, 1399–1411.
Bonny, SPF, Hocquette, J-F, Pethick, DW, Farmer, LJ, Legrand, I, Wierzbicki, J, Allen, P, Polkinghorne, RJ and Gardner, GE 2016. The variation in the eating quality of beef from different sexes and breed classes cannot be completely explained by carcass measurements. Animal 10, 987995.
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