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Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy
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Book description

In a powerful and original contribution to the history of ideas, Hannah Dawson explores the intense preoccupation with language in early-modern philosophy, and presents an analysis of John Locke's critique of words. By examining a broad sweep of pedagogical and philosophical material from antiquity to the late seventeenth century, Dr Dawson explains why language caused anxiety in various writers. Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy demonstrates that developments in philosophy, in conjunction with weaknesses in linguistic theory, resulted in serious concerns about the capacity of words to refer to the world, the stability of meaning, and the duplicitous power of words themselves. Dr Dawson shows that language so fixated all manner of early-modern authors because it was seen as an obstacle to both knowledge and society. She thereby uncovers a novel story about the problem of language in philosophy, and in the process reshapes our understanding of early-modern epistemology, morality and politics.

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Contents

Bibliography
Bibliography
MANUSCRIPT SOURCES
Bodleian library, Oxfordthe lovelace collection
MS. Locke c. 25: miscellaneous personal papers of John Locke, c. 1652–1704.
MS. Locke c. 27: papers of John Locke relating to theology and religion.
MS. Locke c. 28, fos. 33–40: contents list by Locke of Draft B (De intellectu humano, 1671, An Essay).
MS. Locke c. 28, fos. 42–9: notes by Locke, 1677, on his translation of three of Pierre Nicole's Essais de morale.
MS. Locke c. 28, fos. 52–82: an abstract of Locke's manuscript of An Essay concerning Humane Understanding in the hand of S. Brownover with a few corrections and additions by Locke.
MS. Locke c. 28, fos. 157–8: notes by Locke on the division of the sciences.
MS. Locke d. 1: commonplace book of John Locke. Most of the entries are dated 1679 but there are few dated 1692 (pp. 177–89).
MS. Locke d. 3, pp. 1–86: An Examination of P. Malebranche's Opinion of Seeing All Things in God, by Locke in the hand of S. Brownover.
MS. Locke e. 1: drafts by John Locke of additions to An Essay concerning Humane Understanding which were included in the 4th edn (1700).
MS. Locke e. 2, fos. 1–100: Locke's final draft of A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans, dated 1702.
MS. Locke e. 2, fos. 168–99: Locke's final draft of A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians.
MS. Locke e. 2, fos. 200–32: Locke's final draft of A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistle of St. Paul to the Galatians, dated 1703.
MS. Locke e. 7: Quest: Whether the Civill Magistrate may lawfully impose and determine ye use of indifferent things in reference to Religious Worship, a treatise written (1660?) by John Locke in answer to The Great Question concerning Things Indifferent in Religious Worship by Edward Bagshaw the younger.
MS. Locke f. 1: journal of John Locke, 12 November 1675 – 13 December 1676.
MS. Locke f. 2: journal of John Locke, 1677.
MS. Locke f. 3: journal of John Locke, 1678.
MS. Locke f. 4: journal of John Locke, 1680.
MS. Locke f. 5: journal of John Locke, 1681.
MS. Locke f. 6: journal of John Locke, 1682.
MS. Locke f. 7: journal of John Locke, 1683.
MS. Locke f. 8: journal of John Locke, 1684–85.
MS. Locke f. 9: journal of John Locke, 1686–88.
MS. Locke f. 10: journal of John Locke, 1 January 1689 – 24 October 1704.
MS. Locke f. 30: notes by Locke on the books of the New Testament consisting chiefly of extracts from commentaries.
MS. Locke f. 32: a parchment box containing notes by Locke on Simon, Histoire critique du Vieux Testament and on books of the Old Testament from Job to Malachi.
MS. Locke f. 33, fos. 8–25: a notebook containing entries in an unidentified hand on logic.
British library, London
MS. Stowe 990, fo. 162r: printed appendix entitled ‘Dialectica Universa’, Douay, 1732.
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