Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home
Eat or be Eaten
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 18
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Porter, Leila M. and Garber, Paul A. 2004. Goeldi's monkeys: A primate paradox?. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, Vol. 13, Issue. 3, p. 104.

    Fashing, Peter J. Dierenfeld, Ellen S. and Mowry, Christopher B. 2007. Influence of Plant and Soil Chemistry on Food Selection, Ranging Patterns, and Biomass of Colobus guereza in Kakamega Forest, Kenya. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 28, Issue. 3, p. 673.

    Enstam, Karin L. 2007. Primate Anti-Predator Strategies. p. 308.

    Stone, Anita I. 2007. Age and seasonal effects on predator-sensitive foraging in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus): a field experiment. American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 69, Issue. 2, p. 127.

    Erhart, Elizabeth M. and Overdorff, Deborah J. 2008. Rates of Agonism by Diurnal Lemuroids: Implications for Female Social Relationships. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 29, Issue. 5, p. 1227.

    Bezanson, Michelle 2009. Life history and locomotion inCebus capucinusandAlouatta palliata. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 140, Issue. 3, p. 508.

    Cantor, Chris 2009. Post-traumatic stress disorder: evolutionary perspectives. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 43, Issue. 11, p. 1038.

    Fuentes, Agustin and Hockings, Kimberley J. 2010. The ethnoprimatological approach in primatology. American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 72, Issue. 10, p. 841.

    Fuentes, Agustín Wyczalkowski, Matthew A. and MacKinnon, Katherine C. 2010. Niche Construction through Cooperation: A Nonlinear Dynamics Contribution to Modeling Facets of the Evolutionary History in the Genus Homo. Current Anthropology, Vol. 51, Issue. 3, p. 435.

    Barbknecht, Andrea E. Fairbanks, W. Sue Rogerson, Jared D. Maichak, Eric J. Scurlock, Brandon M. and Meadows, Laura L. 2011. Elk parturition site selection at local and landscape scales. The Journal of Wildlife Management, Vol. 75, Issue. 3, p. 646.

    Quintino, Erika Patrícia and Bicca-Marques, Júlio César 2013. Predation of Alouatta puruensis by Boa constrictor. Primates, Vol. 54, Issue. 4, p. 325.

    Farris, Zach J. Karpanty, Sarah M. Ratelolahy, Felix and Kelly, Marcella J. 2014. Predator–Primate Distribution, Activity, and Co-occurrence in Relation to Habitat and Human Activity Across Fragmented and Contiguous Forests in Northeastern Madagascar. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 35, Issue. 5, p. 859.

    JENSEN, FRANK JACOBSEN, JETTE BREDAHL STRANGE, NIELS and THORSEN, BO JELLESMARK 2014. WILDLIFE RESERVES, POPULATIONS, AND HUNTING OUTCOME WITH SMART WILDLIFE. Natural Resource Modeling, Vol. 27, Issue. 3, p. 376.

    Heesen, Marlies Macdonald, Sally Ostner, Julia Schülke, Oliver and Wright, J. 2015. Ecological and Social Determinants of Group Cohesiveness and Within-Group Spatial Position in Wild Assamese Macaques. Ethology, Vol. 121, Issue. 3, p. 270.

    Eppley, Timothy M. Watzek, Julia Ganzhorn, Jörg U. and Donati, Giuseppe 2017. Predator avoidance and dietary fibre predict diurnality in the cathemeral folivore Hapalemur meridionalis . Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Vol. 71, Issue. 1,

    Muroyama, Yasuyuki 2017. Variations in within-group inter-individual distances between birth- and non-birth seasons in wild female patas monkeys. Primates, Vol. 58, Issue. 1, p. 115.

    Cheyne, Susan M. Supiansyah Adul Neale, Claire J. Thompson, Carolyn Wilcox, Cara H. Smith, Yvette C. Ehlers and Smith, David A. Ehlers 2018. Down from the treetops: red langur (Presbytis rubicunda) terrestrial behavior. Primates, Vol. 59, Issue. 5, p. 437.

    Melin, Amanda D. Webb, Shasta E. Williamson, Rachel E. and Chiou, Kenneth L. 2018. Primate Life Histories, Sex Roles, and Adaptability. p. 161.

    ×
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    Eat or be Eaten
    • Online ISBN: 9780511610233
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511610233
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

Predator sensitive foraging represents the strategies that animals employ to balance the need to eat against the need to avoid being eaten. Ecologists working with a wide range of taxa have developed sophisticated theoretical models of these strategies, and have produced elegant data to test them. However, only recently have primatologists begun to turn their attention to this area of research. This volume brings together primary data from a variety of primate species living in both natural habitats and experimental settings, and explores the variables that may play a role in primates' behavioural strategies. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that predator sensitive foraging is relevant to many primates, of various body sizes and group sizes and living in different environments. Eat or be Eaten encourages further discussion and investigation of the subject. It will make fascinating reading for researchers and students in primatology, ecology and animal behaviour.

Reviews

Refine List

Actions for selected content:

Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Contents

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed