Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Biology and Pathology of the Oocyte
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 3
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Buy the print book

Book description

The human oocyte or egg is the rarest and most rapidly ageing cell in the body, and yet one that is essential for fertility. This 2003 book is about the development, biology and pathology of the oocyte, and technologies to manipulate, enhance and control fertility. These technologies are paving the way for overcoming infertility, avoiding inherited diseases and creating genetically engineered animals from embryo stem cells and cloning. This progress would have been impossible without the myriad of scientific and technical developments covered in this book, including the ability to manipulate and fertilize oocytes in vitro. World-leading experts provide contributions on basic and applied science of the egg, its clinical manipulation, and its pivotal role in reproductive medicine and biology.

Reviews

Review of the hardback:‘… possibly the definitive work on the oocyte in 350 pages illustrated by a further 12 pages of colour figures … this book is thus not only essential reading for all scientists and clinicians involved with infertility, it has a wider appeal to all specialists in reproductive medicine, animal breeding and even fetal development.’

Source: Fertility & Sterility

Review of the hardback:'It is no small challenge to make a book on the biology and pathology of the oocyte of interest … I am delighted to report that this book has got the balance just right. It provides an authoritative update to the scientist and clinician alike … This book is a comprehensive, but easy to read … It allows us to glimpse the future of reproductive biology and I recommend it highly.'

Source: The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist

Review of the hardback:'It will be an essential reference for scientists and clinicians in reproductive medicine and animal breeding technology, and everyone involved in treating infertility.'

Source: New Medical World Weekly

Refine List

Actions for selected content:

Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Contents


Page 1 of 2



Page 1 of 2


Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed