Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-9hjnw Total loading time: 0.326 Render date: 2022-07-04T15:51:25.418Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

6 - ‘Making Poetry’: The Exemplary Anne Stevenson

John Lucas
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham
Angela Leighton
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Get access

Summary

Lying awake in a provincial town

I think about poets. They are mostly

men or Irish, turn out old yellow

photographs, may use four-letter words,

stick pigs or marry twice, and edit

most of the books and magazines.

This, the opening stanza of Elizabeth Bartlett's poem ‘Stretchmarks’, comes from her collection The Czar Is Dead, published in 1986, which seems a bit late to be complaining. In the bibliography at the back of Consorting with Angels: Essays on Modern Women Poets, Deryn Rees-Jones lists nearly 150 collections of poetry by women which appeared during the 1980s, and although a few were editions of dead poets, and some neither lived nor worked in the UK, they were all published here. Two decades earlier matters were very different. A. Alvarez notoriously excluded women from the twenty poets featured in his 1962 anthology, The New Poetry. True, he added Sylvia Plath to the revised and enlarged second edition, because her late poems, not published when he first went to press, fitted in with his prescription for the new seriousness, whereas her first collection, The Colossus, published in 1959, did not. But Rees-Jones' persuasive account of the title poem of that collection implicitly shows not only how inadequate Alvarez' response was, but why it was likely to be so. ‘As a poem that enacts mourning,’ Rees-Jones writes, ‘“The Colossus” deals with the loss of a literally small pre-adolescent self and both the loss of the father and the phallus, a necessary act if self-integration is to be achieved.’

Type
Chapter
Information
Voyages over Voices
Critical Essays on Anne Stevenson
, pp. 83 - 97
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×