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Introduction

Virtue Theoretic Epistemology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 July 2020

Christoph Kelp
Affiliation:
University of Glasgow
John Greco
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
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Summary

There are three leading theories of normativity: teleology, deontology and virtue theory. All three types of normative theory countenance values, norms and virtues. What they disagree on is the order of explanation. Teleology takes values to be the fundamental normative kind and explains norms and virtues in terms of them. Deontology takes norms to be the fundamental normative kind and explains values and virtues in terms of them. And, finally, virtue theory takes virtues to be the fundamental normative kind and explains norms and values in terms of them.

Type
Chapter
Information
Virtue Theoretic Epistemology
New Methods and Approaches
, pp. 1 - 14
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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