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Section 1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2018

Evelyn J. Bromet
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Stony Brook
Elie G. Karam
Affiliation:
St George Hospital University Medical Center, Lebanon
Karestan C. Koenen
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Dan J. Stein
Affiliation:
University of Cape Town
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Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Global Perspectives from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys
, pp. 1 - 42
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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