Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-mzfmx Total loading time: 0.543 Render date: 2022-08-11T19:03:36.766Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

6 - Plasticity of mature and developing somatosensory systems

from Section A2 - Functional plasticity in CNS system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2012

Jon H. Kaas
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Tim P. Pons
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA
Michael Selzer
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Stephanie Clarke
Affiliation:
Université de Lausanne, Switzerland
Leonardo Cohen
Affiliation:
National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Pamela Duncan
Affiliation:
University of Florida
Fred Gage
Affiliation:
Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The somatosensory system of humans and other primates includes spinal cord and brain stem circuits and nuclei, several thalamic nuclei, and an array of cortical areas that are complexly interconnected to form an impressive network of functionally distinct, interacting parts (Kaas, 2004). The early stages of processing can be summarized in a highly simplified schematic that emphasizes serial steps in the system (Fig. 6.1). Due to nerve and brain injuries, strokes and degeneration, any component of this system can be damaged and partially or fully inactivated. The question we address in this review is what happens to the rest of the system when part of the system is damaged. The answer, of course, is that the system adjusts to the damage, and reorganizes. Components of this reorganization can be adaptive, and help compensate for the loss, but other components can be disruptive and lead to misperceptions, misguided motor control, and sometimes “thalamic” pain (e.g. Doetsch, 1998; Ramachandran and Hirstein, 1998; see Volume II, Chapter 15). Here we review what happens when damage occurs at each of four levels of the system: (a) the receptor or primary afferent level, (b) the level of the brain stem relay to the dorsal column-trigeminal complex, (c) the thalamic ventroposterior nucleus, and (d) primary somatosensory cortex. The effects of lesions of higher-order areas (e) have not been adequately studied yet. However, the consequence of damage not only depends on the level of the injury, but also on the extent and completeness of the injury.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×