Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-frvt8 Total loading time: 0.581 Render date: 2022-09-24T17:46:13.706Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

10 - Plasticity in auditory functions

from Section A2 - Functional plasticity in CNS system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2012

Josef P. Rauschecker
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA
Michael Selzer
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Stephanie Clarke
Affiliation:
Université de Lausanne, Switzerland
Leonardo Cohen
Affiliation:
National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Pamela Duncan
Affiliation:
University of Florida
Fred Gage
Affiliation:
Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego
Get access

Summary

Summary

This chapter covers plasticity in the central auditory system, most notably in the auditory cortex, from a variety of viewpoints. Neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies in animals as well as behavioral and functional imaging studies in humans will be considered. Plasticity in the auditory system will be compared to plasticity in other sensory systems, and the reorganization of the central auditory system during early blindness and deafness will be discussed. The findings from research in auditory cortical plasticity have important implications for the design of auditory prostheses, such as cochlear implants, in the deaf, and visual prostheses in the blind using nonvisual modalities. They also further the understanding and treatment of common ailments, including hearing loss and tinnitus in an aging population as well as the effects of otitis media in young children.

Introduction

Auditory cortex plays a crucial role in higher perceptual and cognitive functions, including those of speech and music, and in the processing of auditory space. Cortical plasticity, as in other sensory systems, is used to fine-tune these higher functions and plays an important role in reorganization after early injury. Auditory cortical plasticity can be demonstrated after lesions of the cochlea and appears to participate in generating tinnitus. Early musical training leads to an expansion of auditory cortex representing complex harmonic sounds. Similarly, the early phonetic environment has a strong influence on speech development and, presumably, cortical organization of speech.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×