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Part III - School and Family Processes of Impacts over Time

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2018

Arthur J. Reynolds
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
Judy A. Temple
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
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Chapter
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Sustaining Early Childhood Learning Gains
Program, School, and Family Influences
, pp. 233 - 302
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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