Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-4hhp2 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-26T05:30:26.708Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

7 - To See or Not to See

French Regularisation Policies and Their Limits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2023

Christina Boswell
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Emile Chabal
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Get access

Summary

Regularisation has been part of the French state's policy response to immigration since World War II. Since the end of labour migration in the mid-1970s, one of the key routes to legal immigration in France has been through regularisation by local administrations. These generally discreet practices reveal an intimate knowledge on the part of street-level bureaucrats of this supposedly invisible population. Alongside this generally low-key process, the French state has also organised more visible ‘mass regularisations’, notably in 1981, 1991 and 1998. This chapter explores the political dynamics shaping the French government’s approach to both ‘exceptional’ and ongoing regularisation. Through archival and interview data, it shows how the French authorities at the local and national level developed an array of strategies to manage the visibility of its regularisation policies.

Type
Chapter
Information
States of Ignorance
Governing Irregular Migrants in Western Europe
, pp. 187 - 213
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Primary Sources

F3: government official, 19 February 2018.Google Scholar
F4: government official, 20 February 2018.Google Scholar
F6: government official, 21 February 2018.Google Scholar
F8: political adviser, 5 March 2018.Google Scholar
F10: government official, 8 March 2018.Google Scholar
F11: government official, 8 March 2018.Google Scholar
F16: government official, 17 April 2018.Google Scholar
F17: NGO official, 18 April 2018.Google Scholar
F20: government official, 24 May 2018.Google Scholar
F21: prefecture official, 25 May 2018.Google Scholar
F23: political adviser, 26 June 2018.Google Scholar
F26: government official, 12 July 2018.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

F3: government official, 19 February 2018.Google Scholar
F4: government official, 20 February 2018.Google Scholar
F6: government official, 21 February 2018.Google Scholar
F8: political adviser, 5 March 2018.Google Scholar
F10: government official, 8 March 2018.Google Scholar
F11: government official, 8 March 2018.Google Scholar
F16: government official, 17 April 2018.Google Scholar
F17: NGO official, 18 April 2018.Google Scholar
F20: government official, 24 May 2018.Google Scholar
F21: prefecture official, 25 May 2018.Google Scholar
F23: political adviser, 26 June 2018.Google Scholar
F26: government official, 12 July 2018.Google Scholar
F3: government official, 19 February 2018.Google Scholar
F4: government official, 20 February 2018.Google Scholar
F6: government official, 21 February 2018.Google Scholar
F8: political adviser, 5 March 2018.Google Scholar
F10: government official, 8 March 2018.Google Scholar
F11: government official, 8 March 2018.Google Scholar
F16: government official, 17 April 2018.Google Scholar
F17: NGO official, 18 April 2018.Google Scholar
F20: government official, 24 May 2018.Google Scholar
F21: prefecture official, 25 May 2018.Google Scholar
F23: political adviser, 26 June 2018.Google Scholar
F26: government official, 12 July 2018.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×