Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-g56fq Total loading time: 0.404 Render date: 2023-02-09T14:06:47.034Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Part Three - Themed section: work, employment and insecurity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 February 2022

Gaby Ramia
Affiliation:
The University of Sydney
Kevin Farnsworth
Affiliation:
University of York
Zoë Irving
Affiliation:
University of York
Get access

Summary

In the post-financial-crisis world, one dimension of social policy that has been propelled to centre stage in advanced economies is employment and the lack of it. High unemployment and the rather limited and unsuccessful current attempts to deal with it serve as a reminder that employment policy, rather than social security conditionality, was central to 20th-century welfare settlements, whatever their variety. Since the heady days of post-war ‘full employment’, however, much has changed: the global (post-)industrial landscape, the gender division of paid work and, in the rich countries, the decline of collective responsibility for the maintenance of employment invested in the state, in favour of supply-focused individualisation. From the 1990s, welfare states embarked upon a range of reforms to relocate themselves in the changing global labour market, following strategies such as the promotion of ‘life-long learning’ to pioneer the sought-after ‘knowledge economy’, ‘maximum participation’ to ensure fiscal balance through ‘making work pay’, and ‘activation’ to prevent exclusion and reskill.

Despite all this intense policy activity, the crises and recessions since 2007 have altered the context in which these strategies operate. World unemployment currently stands at around 6%, but in the advanced economies, it is 8.7%. While, in the past, phenomena such as ‘under-employment’ were associated with the global South, the EU now recognises this and a whole range of other ‘supplementary forms’ of unemployment in its statistical collections. Social policy practice and scholarship have a long-standing engagement with the problem of ‘work’ and its relationship to social security, but policy has an underwhelming record where reconciling the precarious and intermittent reality of postindustrial working life with the industrial social insurance principle is concerned. This failure of social policy to deal with the shift away from labour market security is all the more apparent in the current recession; even Danish ‘flexicurity’, arguably the most developed post-industrial employment–social security model, has been unable to counteract the consequences of global economic interdependence. Recognising that advanced economies are faced with a grave threat to social security, the chapters in Part Three provide a thought-provoking assessment of some key problematics in social and employment policy.

Type
Chapter
Information
Social Policy Review 25
Analysis and Debate in Social Policy, 2013
, pp. 203 - 206
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×