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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

Kate Cooper
Affiliation:
Royal Holloway, University of London
Jamie Wood
Affiliation:
University of Lincoln
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Social Control in Late Antiquity
The Violence of Small Worlds
, pp. 337 - 371
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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