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Chapter 16 - Electroconvulsive Therapy and Neuromodulation Therapies

from Part 2 - Psychopharmacology of the Main Psychotropic Drug Groups

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 May 2020

Peter M. Haddad
Affiliation:
Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar
David J. Nutt
Affiliation:
Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Psychiatry, Department of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London
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Summary

The International Neuromodulation Society (2016) defines therapeutic neuromodulation as ‘the alteration of nerve activity through targeted delivery of a stimulus, such as electrical stimulation or chemical agents, to specific neurological sites in the body’. The term encompasses a wide range of approaches that extend from non-invasive techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the use of implanted devices such as a vagal nerve and deep brain stimulation systems. This chapter reviews the principal neuromodulation therapies relevant to psychiatry. These have been used primarily in treatment-resistant depression, though studies have defined this to differing degrees of stringency. Outside of psychiatry, neuromodulation is widely used.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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