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Chapter 20 - The Clinical Management of Acute Disturbance Including Rapid Tranquillisation

from Part 3 - Specific Therapeutic Areas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 May 2020

Peter M. Haddad
Affiliation:
Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar
David J. Nutt
Affiliation:
Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Psychiatry, Department of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London
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Summary

In psychiatric and emergency healthcare settings, episodes of agitation and violence are relatively common. One meta-analysis reported that 32.4% of patients behaved violently during admission to a psychiatric ward; this was the mean rate of violence based on 122 studies from 11 countries (Bowers et al., 2011). The comparable rate in the UK studies was 41.7%. A study of general adult wards of a UK inner-city mental health trust found violence rates for 49% of men and 39% of women in the 6-month period studied (Hodgins et al., 2007).

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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