Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-p2v8j Total loading time: 0.001 Render date: 2024-05-20T19:56:00.225Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

Postscript: The Early Elizabethan Church

Get access

Summary

On 17 November 1558, between five and six in the morning, and in the sixth year of her reign, Queen Mary died. The news came as no very great surprise, either to the court or to the citizens of London, because her health, never very robust, had been in visible decline for over a month. Elizabeth cannot have been very surprised either because although, according to the traditional story, she was walking in the park at Hatfield when the news reached her, she had in fact been preparing for this moment for some time. Her supporters had been quietly mobilized in case Mary should change her mind at the last minute, and she had been tormenting Philip's special envoy, the Count of Feria, with speculations about her intentions. Between eleven and twelve o'clock that same morning Elizabeth was proclaimed in Cheapside as Queen of England, France and Ireland, and Defender of the Faith by ‘dyvers haroldes of armes’, supported by the assembled nobility of England. The same day the bells of all the city churches rang out, and that night parties and bonfires were set in the streets ‘for the newe quen Elizabeth, quen Mare syster’. Feria had been rightly apprehensive about the Queen's attitude to religion, but for the time being nothing was said. On 19 November Te Deum Laudamus was sung in every church in London, and the following day William Bill, her chaplain, preached at Paul's Cross and made (according to Henry Machyn) a ‘godly sermon’, from which we may conclude that it was uncontroversial. There had been a great deal of anxiety abroad about what would, or might, happen when Queen Mary died. Elizabeth was illegitimate, and relations between the two women were notoriously bad. Would King Philip attempt to ignore his marriage treaty and secure the succession for himself, or would some other pretender emerge? When the new Queen was unchallenged, the country breathed a collective sigh of relief.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Pickering & Chatto
First published in: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×