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Chapter 5 - CT head

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 February 2010

Richard Hopkins
Affiliation:
Cheltenham General Hospital
Carol Peden
Affiliation:
Royal United Hispital, Bath
Sanjay Gandhi
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
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Summary

All computed tomography (CT) scanners use X-rays to produce anatomical images; however, there have been enormous developments over the years in how this is achieved. The broad principle of CT scanning has remained unchanged over the years, but technological advances have been accompanied by changes in the algorithms used. Intravenous contrast used in CT is an iodine-based substance similar to that used for intravenous urograms (IVUs) and numerous other radiological procedures such as angiography. CT scans of the head are usually presented on brain windows, but are also frequently presented on bone windows, particularly in the context of trauma. After the CT scan, the patient should be kept intubated and ventilated, and returned to an intensive therapy area while the case is discussed with the local neurosurgeons. An entirely normal unenhanced CT scan of the brain is not sufficient to completely exclude intracranial metastatic disease.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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  • CT head
  • Edited by Richard Hopkins, Carol Peden, Sanjay Gandhi, University of Bristol
  • Book: Radiology for Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
  • Online publication: 19 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511642166.008
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  • CT head
  • Edited by Richard Hopkins, Carol Peden, Sanjay Gandhi, University of Bristol
  • Book: Radiology for Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
  • Online publication: 19 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511642166.008
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • CT head
  • Edited by Richard Hopkins, Carol Peden, Sanjay Gandhi, University of Bristol
  • Book: Radiology for Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
  • Online publication: 19 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511642166.008
Available formats
×