Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-zdfhw Total loading time: 0.828 Render date: 2022-08-17T11:48:04.665Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Seven - Peasants, Agricultural Intensification, and Collective Action in Premodern States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2021

T. L. Thurston
Affiliation:
University at Buffalo, State University of New York
Manuel Fernández-Götz
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Get access

Summary

Rural sociopolitical complexity in premodern states was quite extensive but variable. However, archaeologists and cultural anthropologists have been slow to recognize and study institutional complexity in rural contexts. Much ink has been spilled regarding economic relationships, “centralized” control, and “imagined communities” (e.g., Davis-Salazar, 2003; Earle & Spriggs, 2015; Flannery, 1972; Isbell, 2000; Kirch, 2010; Paris, 2014; Sanders & Price, 1968; Wright, 1977; Yaeger & Canuto, 2000). But the development of infrastructural power, especially collective power, in rural settlements and its relationship with regional or macroregional political structures has received only scant attention. With respect to contemporary cases, which provide important theoretical frameworks, anthropologists have taken a back seat to political scientists (e.g., Ostrom, 2015; see Lansing, 2012 for an important [partial] exception), whose focus has been on the management of common pool resources – a topic generally ignored by archaeologists. Unfortunately, neither political scientists nor anthropologists have invested much in understanding cooperation and public goods provisioning in rural settlements and landscapes. Conversely, we have made some initial forays into the issue of rural institutional complexity in premodern states and civilization (Blanton & Fargher, 2008); and here we expand to some degree on that discussion.

Type
Chapter
Information
Power from Below in Premodern Societies
The Dynamics of Political Complexity in the Archaeological Record
, pp. 157 - 174
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anderson, B. (1991) Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London, Verso.Google Scholar
Arrow, K. J. (1974) The Limits of Organization. New York, W. W. Norton & Company.Google Scholar
Bhattacharyya, J. (2004) Theorizing community development. Community Development 34 (2), 534.Google Scholar
Birley, A. R. (2000) Hadrian to the Antonines. In Bowman, A. K., Garnsey, P., and Rathbone, D. (eds.) The Cambridge Ancient History, Second Edition, Volume 11: The High Empire, A.D. 70–192, 132194. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blake, S. P. (1991) Shahjahanabad: The Sovereign City in Mughal India, 1639–1739. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blanton, R. E. (1998) Beyond centralization: Steps toward a theory of egalitarian behavior in archaic states. In Feinman, G. M. & Marcus, J. (eds.) Archaic states, 135172. Santa Fe, School of Advanced Research.Google Scholar
Blanton, R. E. & Fargher, L. (2008) Collective Action in the Formation of Pre-Modern States. New York, Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blanton, R. E. & Fargher, L. (2011) The collective logic of pre-modern cities. World Archaeology 43 (3), 505522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blanton, R. E. & Fargher, L. (2012) Neighborhoods and the civic constitutions of pre-modern cities as seen from the perspective of collective action. In Arnauld, M. C., Manzanilla, L. R., & Smith, M. E. (eds.) The Neighborhood as a Social and Spatial Unit in Mesoamerican Cities, 2752. Tucson, University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
Blanton, R. E. & Fargher, L. (2016) How Humans Cooperate: Confronting the Challenges of Collective Action. Boulder, University Press of Colorado.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blanton, R. E., Feinman, G. M., Kowalewski, S. A., & Peregrine, P. N. (1996) A dual-processual theory for the evolution of Mesoamerican civilization. Current Anthropology 37 (1), 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Calnek, E. E. (1976) The internal structure of Tenochtitlan. In Wolf, E. (ed.) Mexico: Studies of Pre-Hispanic Ecology and Society, 287302. Albuquerque, University of New Mexico Press.Google Scholar
Carballo, D. M., Roscoe, P., & Feinman, G. M. (2014) Cooperation and collective action in the cultural evolution of complex societies. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 21 (1), 98133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carrasco Pizana, P. (1971) Los Barrios Antiguos de Cholula. Estudios y Documentos de la Región de Puebla-Tlaxcala 3, 988.Google Scholar
Coase, R. H. (1937) The nature of the firm. Economica 4 (16), 386405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Commons, J. R. (1931) Institutional economics. The American Economic Review 21 (4), 648657.Google Scholar
Davis-Salazar, K. L. (2003) Late Classic Maya water management and community organization at Copan, Honduras. Latin American Antiquity 14 (3), 275299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dirks, N. B. (1987) The Hollow Crown: Ethnohistory of an Indian Kingdom. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Earle, T. & Spriggs, M. (2015) Political economy in prehistory: A Marxist approach to Pacific sequences. Current Anthropology 56 (4), 515544.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fargher, L. F. (2009) A comparison of the spatial distribution of agriculture and craft specialization in five state-level societies. Journal of Anthropological Research 65 (3), 353387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fargher, L. F. (2016) Corporate power strategies, collective action, and control of principals: A cross-cultural perspective. In Fargher, L. F. & Heredia Espinoza, V. Y. (eds.) Alternative Pathways to Complexity: A Collection of Essays on Architecture, Economics, Power, and Cross-Cultural Analysis, 309326. Boulder, University Press of Colorado.Google Scholar
Fargher, L. F. & Blanton, R. E. (2007) Revenue, voice, and public goods in three pre-modern states. Comparative Studies in Society and History 49 (4), 848882.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flannery, K. V. (1972) The cultural evolution of civilizations. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 3 (1), 399426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Galsterer, H. (2000) Local and provincial institutions and government. In Bowman, A. K., Garnsey, P., & Rathbone, D. (eds.) The Cambridge Ancient History, Second Edition, Volume 11: The High Empire, A.D. 70–192, 344360. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gans, H. J. (1961) Planning and social life: Friendship and neighbor relations in suburban communities. Journal of the American Institute of Planners 27 (2), 134140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Geertz, C. (1980) Negara: The Theatre State in Nineteenth-Century Bali. Princeton, Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Habib, I. (1963) The Agrarian System of Mughal India (1556–1707). Bombay, Asia Publishing House.Google Scholar
Hansen, M. H. (1999) The Athenian Democracy in the Age of Demosthenes: Structure, Principles, and Ideology. Norman, University of Oklahoma Press.Google Scholar
Hardin, R. (1982) Collective Action. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Heijdra, M. (1998) The socio-economic development of rural China during the Ming. In Twitchett, D. & Mote, F. W. (eds.) The Cambridge History of China, Volume 8, The Ming Dynasty, 1368–1644, Part 2, 417578. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hirschman, A. O. (1970) Exit, Voice, and Loyalty: Responses to Decline in Firms, Organizations, and States. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Hobsbawm, E. (1964) Introduction. In Hobsbawm, E. (ed.) Karl Marx: Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations, 965. New York, International Publishers.Google Scholar
Isbell, W. H. (2000) What we should be studying: The “imagined community” and the “natural community.” In Canuto, M. A. & Yaeger, J. (eds.) The Archaeology of Communities: A New World Perspective, 243266. New York, Routledge.Google Scholar
Kirch, P. V. (2010) How Chiefs Became Kings: Divine Kingship and the Rise of Archaic States in Ancient Hawai’i. Berkeley, University of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kiser, L. L. & Ostrom, E. (2000) The three worlds of action: A metatheoretical synthesis of institutional approaches. In McGinnis, M. D. (ed.) Polycentric Games and Institutions, 5688. Ann Arbor, The University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Lansing, J. S. (1987) Balinese “water temples” and the management of irrigation. American Anthropologist 89, 326341.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lansing, J. S. (2012) Perfect Order: Recognizing Complexity in Bali. Princeton, Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Lansing, J. S. & Kremer, J. N. (1993) Emergent properties of Balinese water temple networks: Co-adaptation on a rugged fitness landscape. American Anthropologist 95, 97114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levi, M. (1988) Of Rule and Revenue. Berkeley, University of California Press.Google Scholar
Locke, J. (1689 [1982]) Second Treatise of Government. Wheeling, Harlan Davidson, Inc.Google Scholar
Lockhart, J. (1992) The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries. Stanford, Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Mann, M. (1984) The autonomous power of the state: Its origins, mechanisms, and results. European Journal of Sociology 25, 185213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
March, J. G. & Simon, H. A. (1958) Organizations. Oxford, Wiley.Google Scholar
Marx, K. (1904) A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, translation by N. I. Stone. Chicago, Charles H. Kerr & Company.Google Scholar
Mill, J. (1817) The History of British India. London. London, Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy.Google Scholar
Moertono, S. (1981) State and Statecraft in Old Java: A Study of the Later Mataram Period, 16th to 19th Century. Ithaca, Cornell University.Google Scholar
Montesquieu, C. L. de (1989) [1748] Montesquieu: The Spirit of the Laws. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Monzón, A. (1949) El Calpulli en la Organización Social de los Tenochca. Ciudad de México, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.Google Scholar
Nadel, S. F. (1942) A Black Byzantium: The Kingdom of Nupe in Nigeria. London, Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Nederman, C. (2005) Republic. In Horowitz, M. C. (ed.) New Dictionary of the History of Ideas, 20982103. Detroit, Charles Scribner’s Sons.Google Scholar
North, D. C. (1981) Structure and Change in Economic History. New York, W. W. North and Company.Google Scholar
North, D. C. (1990) Institutions, Institutional Change, and Economic Performance. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norwich, J. J. (1982) A History of Venice. New York, Alfred A. Knopf.Google Scholar
O’Connor, R. A. (1995) Agricultural change and ethnic succession in Southeast Asian states: A case for regional anthropology. Journal of Asian Studies 54, 968996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Offner, J. (1983) Law and Politics in Aztec Texcoco. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Olson, M. (1965) The Logic of Collective Action. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Ostrom, E. (2015) Governing the Commons. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paris, E. H. (2014) Cross-valley communities: Identity and interaction in Early Postclassic Period Highland Chiapas. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 34, 7899.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Polanyi, K. (1944) The Great Transformation. Boston, Beacon Press,Google Scholar
Putnam, R. D. (2000) Bowling Alone: America’s Declining Social Capital. In Crothers, L. & Lockhart, C. (eds.) Culture and Politics: A Reader, 223234. New York, St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
Rabibhadana, A. (1969) The Organization of Thai Society in the Early Bangkok Period, 1782–1873. Ithaca, Cornell University Southeast Asia Program.Google Scholar
Reid, A. (1988) Southeast Asia in the Age of Commerce, 1450–1680. Volume 1: The Lands below the Winds. New Haven, Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Reyes García, L. (1996). El Termino Calpulli en Documentos del Siglo XVI. In Reyes García, L. (ed.) Documentos Nauas de la Ciudad de México del Siglo XVI, 2168. Ciudad de México, CIESAS and Archivo General de la Nación.Google Scholar
Rousseau, J. J. (2002) [1762] The Social Contract. New Haven, Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Sanders, W. T. & Price, B. J. (1968) Mesoamerica: The Evolution of a Civilization. New York, Random House.Google Scholar
Sarkar, J. (1963) Mughal Administration. Calcutta, M. C. Sarkar and Sons.Google Scholar
Simon, H. A. (1945) Administrative Behavior. New York, Free Press.Google Scholar
Sinopoli, C. M. (1994) Political choices and economic strategies in the Vijayanagara Empire. In Brumfiel, E. (ed.) The Economic Anthropology of the State, 223242. Lanham, University Press of America.Google Scholar
Smith, M. E. (2008) Aztec City-State Capitals. Gainesville, University Press of Florida.Google Scholar
Stargardt, J. (1992) Water for courts or countryside: Archaeological evidence from Burma and Thailand reconsidered. In Riggs, J. (ed.) The Gift of Water: Water Management, Cosmology, and the State in South East Asia, 5971. London, London School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.Google Scholar
Stein, B. (1989) The New Cambridge History of India, Volume 1, Part 2: Vijayanagara. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Toshio, F. (1991) The village and agriculture during the Edo Period. In Hall, J. W. (eds.) The Cambridge History of Japan, Volume 4, Early Modern Japan, 478518. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
van Zantwijk, R. A. M. (1985) The Aztec Arrangement: The Social History of Pre-Spanish Mexico. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.Google Scholar
Vella, W. F. (1957) Siam under Rama III, 1824–1851. Locust Valley, J. J. Augustin.Google Scholar
Weber, M. (1947) The Theory of Social and Economic Organization. New York, The Free Press.Google Scholar
Wernke, S. A. (2007) Negotiating community and landscape in the Peruvian Andes: A transconquest view. American Anthropologist 109 (1), 130152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
White, L. (1949) The Science of Culture: A Study of Man and Civilization. New York, Farrar, Straus and Company.Google Scholar
Whitley, J. (2001) The Archaeology of Ancient Greece. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Williams, B. J. & Harvey, H. R. (1997) The Códice de Santa Maria Asunción: Facsimile and Commentary: Households and Lands in Sixteenth-Century Tepetlaoztoc. Salt Lake City, University of Utah Press.Google Scholar
Williamson, O. E. (1981) The economics of organization: The transaction cost approach. American Journal of Sociology 87 (3), 548577.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wittfogel, K. A. (1957) Oriental Despotism: A Study of Total Power. New Haven, Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Wolf, E. R. (1999) Envisioning Power: Ideologies of Dominance and Crisis. Berkeley, University of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wright, H. T. (1977) Recent research on the origin of the state. Annual Review of Anthropology 6, 379397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yaeger, J. & Canuto, M. A. (2000) Introducing an archaeology of communities. In Canuto, M. A. and Yaeger, J. (eds.) The Archaeology of Communities: A New World Perspective, 115. New York, Routledge.Google Scholar
Zorita, A. de (1963) Los Señores de la Nueva España. Ciudad de México, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×