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Part III - The “Cambridge Platonists”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2019

Stephen Gersh
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
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Plotinus' Legacy
The Transformation of Platonism from the Renaissance to the Modern Era
, pp. 125 - 180
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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