Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-h4v4t Total loading time: 0.232 Render date: 2022-06-25T03:00:20.004Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Chapter 22 - The Status and Development of Plant Physiology in India

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2020

S. L. Kochhar
Affiliation:
University of Delhi
Sukhbir Kaur Gujral
Affiliation:
University of Delhi
Get access

Summary

Plant physiology as we know, deals with different life processes operating within the cell, and interactions between the cell and the environment based upon physical, chemical and biological concepts. All these make it highly dynamic and exacting in nature. The science of plant physiology is never static but always changing as new facts are discovered and fresh concepts are developed. With new instrumentation and advances in the knowledge of working of the cell and the discovery of structure of DNA by Watson and Crick (1953), plant physiology has become first increasingly biochemical and then molecular.

A knowledge of plant physiology is essential for different fields of applied botany, whether agronomy, floriculture, forestry, horticulture, landscape gardening, plant breeding, plant pathology, or pharmacognosy. All these applied courses depend upon plant physiology for information regarding how plants grow and develop.

Until the forties, laboratories in England and Germany dominated the scientific scene and many Indian scientists began their career in these countries. However, after the Second World War, during which much of Europe was completely devastated, the focus of major research activity shifted to USA and Canada where new schools were established and many of our scientists went over there to enrich their expertise.

Compared to other parts of the world in India, the discipline of plant physiology has not received the attention it ought to have deserved but still some of our scientists earned distinction at the international level. The undisputed Indian pioneer in experimental research on plants was J. C. Bose (1858–1937), who was knighted by the British in recognition of his contributions to scientific endeavour; entitling him to the use of ‘Sir’ before his name. Basically a physicist, he was widely acclaimed for his discoveries on radio waves and wireless. But in his later years, and particularly after retirement (which to most people spells the end of one's career), Bose was also greatly interested in plant life and became hugely involved in research on plants. In fact, in 1917, he founded an autonomous institute, the Bose Institute (now among the pioneering research centres in India).

Type
Chapter
Information
Plant Physiology
Theory and Applications
, pp. 651 - 660
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×