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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2024

Patricia Gaborik
Affiliation:
Accademia Nazionale d'Arte Drammatica ‘Silvio d'Amico’
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Pirandello in Context , pp. 299 - 301
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2024

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References

Primary Sources

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Secondary Sources

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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Patricia Gaborik, Accademia Nazionale d'Arte Drammatica ‘Silvio d'Amico’
  • Book: Pirandello in Context
  • Online publication: 14 March 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108339391.046
Available formats
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Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Patricia Gaborik, Accademia Nazionale d'Arte Drammatica ‘Silvio d'Amico’
  • Book: Pirandello in Context
  • Online publication: 14 March 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108339391.046
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Patricia Gaborik, Accademia Nazionale d'Arte Drammatica ‘Silvio d'Amico’
  • Book: Pirandello in Context
  • Online publication: 14 March 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108339391.046
Available formats
×