Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-mwx4w Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-17T05:58:15.354Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

10 - Pheromones

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 December 2009

H. F. van Emden
Affiliation:
University of Reading
M. W. Service
Affiliation:
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Get access

Summary

Introduction

It is becoming increasingly apparent that many behavioural activities of insects (e.g. dispersal/migration, mating, aggregation, alarm signalling and even fecundity) are under control via chemical messengers produced by individuals and liberated into the environment either as volatiles or in faeces, regurgitated food, etc. and perceived by the recipient either olfactorily or on contact. Also, chemical signals from different species, including ones from different biological Kingdoms (e.g. plants), can control insect behaviour. Those chemicals which pass messages between individuals of the same species have been given the general blanket term of ‘pheromones’ (see Birch and Haynes, 1982 for a good basic account) and are available to man for manipulating insect behaviour either by the use of caged insects, extracts from insects or plants or synthetic production (of the actual pheromone or a chemical ‘mimic’ thereof). Like all within- and between-species chemical signals, pheromones have particular advantages for pest control because they are usually highly species-specific, leave no undesirable residues in the environment and are effective in very minute quantities.

The umbrella term ‘ecomone’ was coined in 1977 to encompass all these communication signals, and pheromones – one type of ‘ecomone’ – are the subject of this chapter. The term semiochemical is also commonly used for any behaviour-modifying chemicals involved in communication between organisms, and has recently virtually replaced the term ‘ecomone’. Ecomones/semiochemicals other than pheromones (allomones, kairomones and synomones) are signals between different species where respectively the transmitter benefits (e.g. predator-repellent odours), the receiver benefits (e.g. signals from prey perceived by natural enemies) or both benefit (e.g. natural enemies responding to the odour of a pest-damaged plant).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Pheromones
  • H. F. van Emden, University of Reading, M. W. Service, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
  • Book: Pest and Vector Control
  • Online publication: 03 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616334.011
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Pheromones
  • H. F. van Emden, University of Reading, M. W. Service, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
  • Book: Pest and Vector Control
  • Online publication: 03 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616334.011
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Pheromones
  • H. F. van Emden, University of Reading, M. W. Service, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
  • Book: Pest and Vector Control
  • Online publication: 03 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616334.011
Available formats
×