Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-xm8r8 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-15T14:04:23.712Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

4 - Application of insecticides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 December 2009

H. F. van Emden
Affiliation:
University of Reading
M. W. Service
Affiliation:
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The subject of pesticide application involves some really fascinating topics such as the fluid kinetics of droplet production and the engineering aspects of spray outlets (nozzles) and pressure sources (pumps). Much of this, however, lies outside the scope of this book, and readers are referred to Matthews (2000) for an excellent and well-illustrated account.

Formulation and the method of application can have almost greater influence on the efficiency and selectivity of kill than the choice of active ingredient. How these variables may be manipulated so that the pesticide application is less damaging to natural enemies is discussed in Chapter 13. It is a long, long way in biological terms from the emission of pesticide from a machine to achieving kill of a pest. The first problem is to get the right amount of chemical onto the target. There can be many targets. Plant surfaces are not only crops or competitive weeds; pesticides may also be sprayed on uncultivated land. In the past blanket spraying of vegetation, especially riverine vegetation, with residual insecticides to kill the tsetse fly vectors of both human trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) and animal trypanosomiasis (nagana) which can devastate the livestock industry in sub-Saharan Africa, has been commonly practised. Before the persistence of DDT in the environment was recognized (see Chapter 5), hedgerows adjacent to crops were sprayed to kill roosting cabbage and carrot root flies (Delia radicum and Psila rosae respectively).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×