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Chapter 9 - Support Systems and Patient Experience Architecture for Fertility Care of Women over 40 in the 2020s

from Section 5 - Optimal Deployment of ART beyond 40

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2022

Dimitrios S. Nikolaou
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London
David B. Seifer
Affiliation:
Yale Reproductive Medicine, New Haven, CT
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Summary

“Patient support” is a concept far broader than the traditional offer of a phone number for a counselor and handing her a pamphlet. It encompasses optimal clinical management, as well as an organizational structure for the whole service to optimize patient experience. We first summarize supporting women over 40 during the COVID pandemic, followed by providing key steps of an individualized clinical management strategy, and the requirements of patient support structures. However, unlike previous publications, this chapter does not end by simply outlining what is desirable. It proceeds to a number of practical steps that fertility services can follow, using the framework of “patient experience architecture” to build suitable structured pathways. Furthermore, it explores the path of digital transformation in an effort to reduce cost and improve consistency delivering core professional values in every interaction. At the end of the chapter there is a short list of useful reading.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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