Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-4v6tc Total loading time: 0.498 Render date: 2023-02-01T07:38:38.880Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Foreword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 August 2009

Alexander Heazell
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
John Clift
Affiliation:
City Hospital, Birmingham
Get access

Summary

Obstetric anaesthesia is a specialty interest within anaesthesia that has many features different from other areas of practice. Most obviously two patients, mother and baby, are affected by the same anaesthetic. Most of the mothers are healthy and are expecting a healthy baby as the end result of a straightforward physiological process. It is a very emotional time and is distressing when complications occur, especially if these are life-threatening to mother or baby. Most women remain awake through childbirth whether they have a vaginal or Caesarean delivery and often look to the anaesthetist for reassurance. The anaesthetist who is aware of the ‘bigger picture’ and knows about the complications that might occur and how the obstetrician and midwife will deal with them will be able to provide this reassurance with confidence.

The role of anaesthetists in obstetrics has changed over the years, such that it is now unthinkable that they were once regarded as mere technicians to deliver anaesthesia for an emergency Caesarean section and then leave the obstetric unit to fulfil duties elsewhere. Epidural analgesia during labour has become an expectation of many mothers and it is now used by almost one quarter of women. The obstetric anaesthetist is now an integral part of the maternity team where they need to be effective.

The importance of effective interdisciplinary working for maternity care is emphasised in all documents relating to standards and planning of maternity services. These include successive Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths, Safer Childbirth and Maternity Matters.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×