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Chapter 30 - Musculoskeletal Considerations in Pregnancy

from Section 5 - Medical and Surgical Emergencies During Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2021

Edwin Chandraharan
Affiliation:
St George's University of London
Sir Sabaratnam Arulkumaran
Affiliation:
St George's University of London
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Summary

Cauda Equina Syndrom

Type
Chapter
Information
Obstetric and Intrapartum Emergencies
A Practical Guide to Management
, pp. 214 - 220
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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