Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-zcgq2 Total loading time: 0.359 Render date: 2022-10-07T03:14:33.722Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true
Object Categorization Object Categorization
Computer and Human Vision Perspectives
Buy print or eBook[Opens in a new window]

Book contents

7 - Object Recognition Through Reasoning About Functionality: A Survey of Related Work

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2010

Sven J. Dickinson
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Aleš Leonardis
Affiliation:
University of Ljubljana
Bernt Schiele
Affiliation:
Technische Universität, Darmstadt, Germany
Michael J. Tarr
Affiliation:
Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania
Get access

Summary

Recognition Based on Functionality

Minsky (1991) is one of several well-known researchers who have argued for the necessity of representing knowledge about functionality:

… it is not enough to classify items of information simply in terms of the features or structures of those items themselves. This is because we rarely use a representation in an intentional vacuum, but we always have goals – and two objects may seem similar for one purpose but different for another purpose. Consequently, we must also take into account the functional aspects of what we know, and therefore we must classify things (and ideas) according to what they can be used for, or which goals they can help us achieve. Two armchairs of identical shape may seem equally comfortable as objects for sitting in, but those same chairs may seem very different for other purposes, for example, if they differ much in weight, fragility, cost, or appearance. … In each functional context we need to represent particularly well the heuristic connections between each object's internal features and relationships, and the possible functions of those objects.

The early part of this quote contrasts the approach of representing (only) features or structure of objects with the approach of representing knowledge about how an object functions to achieve a goal. Particularly in computer vision, objects have traditionally been represented by their shape or their appearance. Object recognition based on reasoning about functionality stands in contrast to these more traditional approaches, with the aim of achieving recognition at a more generic level.

Type
Chapter
Information
Object Categorization
Computer and Human Vision Perspectives
, pp. 129 - 147
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×