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Chapter V - THE CULTURE SYSTEM, 1830–1850

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 September 2010

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Summary

1. The Theory of the Culture System. When Van den Bosch landed in Java in January, 1830, he had little more than a general idea of what he intended. His two sets of instructions, one secret for him alone and one for the High Government, had been discreetly drafted by Baud with one eye on Elout. For the most part they dwelt, naturally, on the importance of economy, as, for example, by the constitution of local councils to relieve Government of expenditure on local amenities; they also urged the importance of repressing disorder and of attaching the natives to Dutch rule not only, after the customary formula, by protecting them against arbitrary treatment and ill usage but, possibly, by the cautious encouragement of Christianity. They turned chiefly, however, on the increase of production; Van den Bosch was to aim at raising the production of export crops over the whole country to the level of the Preanger, where it was estimated to yield f. 5 per household. They appeared also to impress on him the importance of encouraging European enterprise, but, read between the lines, told him in effect not to encourage it too freely to the detriment of State cultivation; this direction was in fact “a subterfuge” by which Baud dexterously circumvented the probable opposition of Elout.

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Netherlands India
A Study of Plural Economy
, pp. 115 - 147
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010
First published in: 1967

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