Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4hcbs Total loading time: 0.628 Render date: 2021-11-28T00:00:22.769Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Part VI - Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

C. N. Duckworth
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle upon Tyne
A. Cuénod
Affiliation:
University of Leicester
D. J. Mattingly
Affiliation:
University of Leicester
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Austen, R.A. 2010. Trans-Saharan Africa in World History. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Bender Jørgensen, L. 2017. Textiles and textile trade in the first millennium AD: Evidence from Egypt. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 231–58.Google Scholar
Blench, R. 2019. The linguistic prehistory of the Sahara. In Gatto et al. 2009a, 431–63.Google Scholar
Bokbot, Y. 2019. Protohistoric and Pre-Islamic funerary archaeology in the Moroccan Pre-Sahara. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 315–40.Google Scholar
Bokbot, Y. 2020. The origins of urbanisation and structured political power in Morocco: Indigenous phenomenon or foreign colonisation? In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 476–97.Google Scholar
Bonifay, M. 2017. Can we speak of pottery and amphora ‘import substitution’ in inland regions of Roman Africa? In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 341–68.Google Scholar
Buzon, M.R., Schrader, S.A. and Bowen, G.J. 2019. Isotopic approaches to mobility in Northern Africa: Bioarchaeological examination of Egyptian/Nubian interaction in the Nile Valley. In Gatto et al. 2019, 223–46.Google Scholar
Capel, C. 2020. At the dawn of Sijilmasa: New historical focus on the process of emergence of a Saharan state and a caravan city. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 594620.Google Scholar
Cissé, M. 2017. The Trans-Saharan trade connection with Gao (Mali) during the first millennium AD. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 101–30.Google Scholar
Clarke, J. and Brooks, N. 2019. Burial practices in Western Sahara. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 341–72.Google Scholar
Dussubieux, L. 2017. Glass beads in Trans-Saharan trade. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 414–32.Google Scholar
Edwards, D. 2019. Between the Nile and the Sahara: Some comparative perspectives. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 195222.Google Scholar
Edwards, D. 2020. Early states and urban forms in the Middle Nile. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 359–95.Google Scholar
Ehret, C. 2019. Berber peoples in the Sahara and North Africa: Linguistic historical proposals. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 464–94.Google Scholar
Fentress, E.W.B. 2019. The archaeological and genetic correlates of Amazigh linguistics. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 495524.Google Scholar
Gatto, M., Mattingly, D.J., Ray, N. and Sterry, M. (eds) 2019a. Burials, Migration and Identity in the Ancient Sahara and Beyond. Trans-Saharan Archaeology, Volume 2. Series editor Mattingly, D.J.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press and the Society for Libyan Studies.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gatto, M.C., Mori, L. and Zerboni, A. 2019b. Identity markers in south-western Fazzan: Were the people of the Wadi Tanzzuft/Tadrart Akakus region Garamantes? In Gatto et al. 2019a, 108–33.Google Scholar
Guédon, S. 2017. Circulation and trade of textiles in the southern borders of Roman Africa: New hypotheses. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 259–84.Google Scholar
Haour, A. 2017. What made Islamic trade distinctive, as compared to pre-Islamic trade? In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 80100.Google Scholar
Horton, M., Crowther, A. and Boivin, N. 2017. Ships of the desert, camels of the ocean: An Indian Ocean perspective on Trans-Saharan trade. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 131–55.Google Scholar
Leitch, V., Duckworth, C., Cuénod, A., Mattingly, D.J., Sterry, M. and Cole, F. 2017. Early Saharan trade: The inorganic evidence. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 287340.Google Scholar
Leone, A. 2017. Pottery and trade in North and Sub-Saharan Africa during Late Antiquity. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 369–92.Google Scholar
MacDonald, K. 2011. A view from the south: Sub-Saharan evidence for contacts between North Africa, Mauritania and the Niger 1000 BC–AD 700. In Dowler, A and Galvin, E.R. (eds), Money, Trade and Trade Routes in Pre-Islamic North Africa, London: British Museum Press, 7282.Google Scholar
MacDonald, K.C. 2020. Architecture and settlement growth on the southern edge of the Sahara: Timing and possible implications for interactions with the North. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 498520.Google Scholar
MacEachern, S. 2019. Burial practices, settlement and regional connections around the southern Lake Chad Basin, 1500 BC–AD 1500. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 399428.Google Scholar
McIntosh, S.K. 2020. Long-distance exchange and urban trajectories in the first millennium AD: Case studies from the Middle Niger and Middle Senegal river valleys. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 521–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magnavita, C. 2020. First millennia BC/AD fortified settlements at Lake Chad: Implications for the origins of urbanisation and state formation in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 564–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magnavita, S. 2013. Initial encounters: Seeking traces of ancient trade connections between West Africa and the wider world. Afriques 4. http://afriques.revues.org/1145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magnavita, S. 2017. Track and trace: Archaeometric approaches to the study of early Saharan trade. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 392413.Google Scholar
Magnavita, S. 2019. Burial and society at Kissi, Burkina Faso. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 375–98.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J. 2017. The Garamantes and the origins of Saharan trade: State of the field and future agendas. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 152.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J. and Cole, F. 2017. Visible and invisible commodities of trade: The significance of organic materials in Saharan trade. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 212–30.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J. and Sterry, M. 2020a. Introduction to the themes of urbanisation and state formation in the ancient Sahara and beyond. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 150.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J. and Sterry, M. 2020b. State formation in the Sahara and beyond. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 695721.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Leitch, V., Duckworth, C.N., Cuénod, A., Sterry, M. and Cole, F. (eds) 2017a. Trade in the Ancient Sahara and Beyond. Trans-Saharan Archaeology, Volume 1. Series editor Mattingly, D.J.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press and the Society for Libyan Studies.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Cuénod, A., Duckworth, C., Leitch, V. and Sterry, M. 2017b. Concluding discussion. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 433–40.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Sterry, M., al-Haddad, M. and Bokbot, Y. 2018. Beyond the Garamantes: The early development of Saharan oases. In Purdue, L, Charbonnier, J and Khalidi, L (eds), Des refuges aux oasis: Vivre en milieu aride de la Préhistoire à aujourd’hui. XXXVIIIe rencontres internationales d’archéologie et d’histoire d’Antibes, Antibes: Éditions APDCA, 205–28.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Gatto, M., Ray, N. and Sterry, M. 2019a. Introduction: Migration, burial and identity in the Sahara. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 150.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Gatto, M., Ray, N. and Sterry, M. 2019b. Dying to be Garamantian: Burial and migration in Fazzan. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 51107.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Merlo, S., Mori, L. and Sterry, M. 2020a. Garamantian oasis settlements in Fazzan. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 53111.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Sterry, M., al-Haddad, M. and Trousset, P. 2020b. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the Northern Sahara. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 187238.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D.J., Sterry, M., Rayne, L. and al-Haddad, M. 2020c. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the Eastern Sahara. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 112–46.Google Scholar
Nixon, S. 2017. Trans-Saharan gold trade in pre-modern times: Available evidence and research agendas. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 156–88.Google Scholar
Nixon, S. 2020. The early Islamic Trans-Saharan market towns of West Africa. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 621–66.Google Scholar
Papi, E. 2019. Revisiting first millennium BC graves in north-west Morocco. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 281311.Google Scholar
Power, R., Nikita, E., Mattingly, D.J., Lahr, M.M. and O’Connell, T.C. 2019. Human mobility and identity: variation, diet and migration in relation to the Garamantes of Fazzan. In Gatto et al. 2019, 134–61.Google Scholar
Ricci, F., Tafuri, M.A., Castorina, F., di Vincenzo, F., Mori, L. and Manzi, G. 2019. The Garamantes from Fewet (Ghat, Fazzan, Libya): A skeletal perspective. In Gatto et al. 2019, 162–92.Google Scholar
Sanmartí, J., Cruz Folch, I., Campilo, J. and Montanero, D. 2019. Numidian burial practices. In Gatto et al. 2019a: 249–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sanmartí, J., Kallala, N., Belarte, M.C., Ramon, J., Cantero, F.J., López, L., Portillo, M. and Valenzuela, S. 2020. Numidian state formation in the Tunisian High Tell. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 438–75.Google Scholar
Scheele, J. 2017. The need for nomads: Camel-herding, raiding and Saharan trade. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 5579.Google Scholar
Scheele, J. 2020. Urbanisation, inequality and political authority in the Sahara. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 667–91.Google Scholar
Sterry, M. and Mattingly, D.J. (eds) 2020a. Urbanisation and State Formation in the Ancient Sahara and Beyond, Trans-Saharan Archaeology, Volume 3, series editor D.J. Mattingly, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press and the Society for Libyan Studies.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sterry, M. and Mattingly, D.J. 2020b. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the Southern Sahara. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 277329.Google Scholar
Sterry, M. and Mattingly, D.J. 2020c. Discussion: Sedentarisation and urbanisation in the Sahara. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 330–55.Google Scholar
Sterry, M., Mattingly, D.J., Gatto, M. and Ray, N. 2019. Concluding discussion. In Gatto et al. 2019a, 525–62.Google Scholar
Sterry, M., Mattingly, D.J. and Bokbot, Y. 2020. Pre-Islamic oasis settlements in the Western Sahara. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 239–76.Google Scholar
Wilson, A.I. 2017. Saharan exports to the Roman world. In Mattingly et al. 2017a, 189208.Google Scholar
Wilson, A.I. 2020. Mediterranean urbanisation in North Africa: Greek, Punic and Roman models. In Sterry and Mattingly 2020a, 396437.Google Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×