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Histaminic Stimulants

from Part II - Medication Reference Tables

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2021

Michael Cummings
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Stephen Stahl
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

References

Actavis Pharma Inc. (2019). Armodafinil Package Insert. Parsippany, New Jersey.Google Scholar
Murillo-Rodríguez, E., Barciela Veras, A., Barbosa Rocha, N., et al. (2018). An overview of the clinical uses, pharmacology, and safety of modafinil. ACS Chem Neurosci, 9, 151158.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Darwish, M., Kirby, M., Hellriegel, E. T., et al. (2009). Armodafinil and modafinil have substantially different pharmacokinetic profiles despite having the same terminal half-lives: analysis of data from three randomized, single-dose, pharmacokinetic studies. Clin Drug Investig, 29, 613623.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Darwish, M., Kirby, M., Robertson, P. Jr., et al. (2008). Interaction profile of armodafinil with medications metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes 1A2, 3A4 and 2C19 in healthy subjects. Clin Pharmacokinet, 47, 6174.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stahl, S. M., Grady, M. M., Munter, N. (2017). Prescriber’s Guide: Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

References

Kumar, R. (2008). Approved and investigational uses of modafinil: an evidence-based review. Drugs, 68, 18031839.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murillo-Rodríguez, E., Barciela Veras, A., Barbosa Rocha, N., et al. (2018). An overview of the clinical uses, pharmacology, and safety of modafinil. ACS Chem Neurosci, 9, 151158.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heritage Pharmaceuticals Inc. (2020). Modafinil Package Insert. East Brunswick, New Jersey.Google Scholar
Wesensten, N. J., Belenky, G., Kautz, M. A., et al. (2002). Maintaining alertness and performance during sleep deprivation: modafinil versus caffeine. Psychopharmacology (Berl), 159, 238247.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cox, J. M., Pappagallo, M. (2001). Modafinil: a gift to portmanteau. Am J Hosp Palliat Care, 18, 408410.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Batéjat, D. M., Lagarde, D. P. (1999). Naps and modafinil as countermeasures for the effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance. Aviat Space Environ Med, 70, 493498.Google ScholarPubMed
Jasinski, D. R., Koyacevic-Ristanovic, R. (2000). Evaluation of the abuse liability of modafinil and other drugs for excessive daytime sleepiness associated with narcolepsy. Clin Neuropharmacol, 23, 149156.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Darwish, M., Kirby, M., Hellriegel, E. T., et al. (2009). Armodafinil and modafinil have substantially different pharmacokinetic profiles despite having the same terminal half-lives: analysis of data from three randomized, single-dose, pharmacokinetic studies. Clin Drug Investig, 29, 613623.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bourdon, L., Jacobs, I., Bateman, W. A., et al. (1994). Effect of modafinil on heat production and regulation of body temperatures in cold-exposed humans. Aviat Space Environ Med, 65, 9991004.Google ScholarPubMed
Stahl, S. M., Grady, M. M., Munter, N. (2017). Prescriber’s Guide: Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

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