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Part II - Basic Ingredients for Adaptive Trial Designs and Common Types

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 March 2023

Jay J. H. Park
Affiliation:
McMaster University, Ontario
Edward J. Mills
Affiliation:
McMaster University, Ontario
J. Kyle Wathen
Affiliation:
Cytel, Cambridge, Massachusetts
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

References

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